Federal

Republicans Target Tax Relief, Push Local Control of Education

January 27, 1999 2 min read

Following are excerpts from the Republican response to President Clinton’s address, delivered by Reps. Jennifer Dunn of Washington and Steve Largent of Oklahoma:

Ms. Dunn: Our democracy is sound. Our economy is prosperous. The state of our union is strong. And no matter what the outcome of the president’s situation, life in America will go on. Our lives will continue to be filled with practical matters, not constitutional ones.

I’ve been a single mother since my boys were little--6 and 8. My life in those days was taken up with making ends meet, trying to get to two soccer games at the same time on two different fields, worrying about dropping the boys off early at school in order to get to work on time. I know how that knot in the pit of your stomach feels. I’ve been there.

I’m still a practical person. You heard the president make a lot of promises to a lot of people tonight, but I’d like to talk to you about two very practical Republican priorities ... tax relief and Social Security reform. ...

Next year, there will be a $63 billion budget surplus. Mr. President, give it back.

Last year, a typical mother and father who both work paid nearly 40 percent of their income in taxes--that means 40 cents of every dollar they earned went to the government in federal, state, or local taxes ... that’s the highest percentage of income ever paid in taxes by American families.

I don’t know about you, but that really bothers me; no wonder so many American families are struggling. ... First, tonight we’re proposing a 10 percent, across-the-board cut in tax rates for every working American. That is the down payment on a simpler, fairer, flatter tax system. ...

In all our tax policies, we start from this premise: The people’s money belongs to the people, not to the government. ...

Mr. Largent: Republicans ... believe market principles like competition work. At the heart of free enterprise is good education. For far too long, we’ve allowed Washington to dictate how our children are taught. One of our priorities is to give control of our schools to local communities. We want the most important election affecting your children’s education to be the one that decides who sits on the school board, not who you send to Washington. Parents deserve the opportunity to choose the best school, with the best curriculum, best teachers, and safest environment for their children.

I recently met with a room full of teachers in Jenks, Okla. I came out of that meeting convinced more than ever that teachers like these know best how federal education dollars should be spent.

That’s why Republicans are leading the effort that will ensure 90 cents of every federal education dollar goes directly to the classroom, empowering parents and teachers, not bureaucrats. ...

Finally, Republicans stand for limited government. Ronald Reagan warned that “a government that is big enough to give you everything you want is also big enough to take everything you have.” And tonight the federal government is still too big and taking more than it should. We will continue our efforts to control Washington’s wasteful spending and its insatiable appetite for your money.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the January 27, 1999 edition of Education Week as Republicans Target Tax Relief, Push Local Control of Education

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
Interactive Learning Best Practices: Creative Ways Interactive Displays Engage Students
Students and teachers alike struggle in our newly hybrid world where learning takes place partly on-site and partly online. Focus, engagement, and motivation have become big concerns in this transition. In this webinar, we will
Content provided by Samsung
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Educator-Driven EdTech Design: Help Shape the Future of Classroom Technology
Join us for a collaborative workshop where you will get a live demo of GoGuardian Teacher, including seamless new integrations with Google Classroom, and participate in an interactive design exercise building a feature based on
Content provided by GoGuardian
School & District Management Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: What Did We Learn About Schooling Models This Year?
After a year of living with the pandemic, what schooling models might we turn to as we look ahead to improve the student learning experience? Could year-round schooling be one of them? What about online

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal CDC: Nearly 80 Percent of K-12, Child-Care Workers Have Had at Least One COVID-19 Shot
About four out of five teachers, school staffers, and child-care workers had first COVID-19 vaccine doses by the end of March, CDC says.
2 min read
John Battle High School teacher Jennifer Daniel receives her COVID-19 vaccine on Jan. 11, 2021. Teachers received their first vaccine during an all-day event at the Virginia Highlands Higher Education Center in Abingdon, Va.
John Battle High School teacher Jennifer Daniel receives her COVID-19 vaccine on Jan. 11at the Virginia Highlands Higher Education Center in Abingdon, Va.
David Crigger/Bristol Herald Courier via AP
Federal Ed. Dept. to Review Title IX Rules on Sexual Assault, Gender Equity, LGBTQ Rights
The review could reopen a Trump-era debate on sexual assault in schools, and it could spark legal discord over transgender student rights.
4 min read
Symbols of gender.
iStock/Getty
Federal Q&A EdWeek Q&A: Miguel Cardona Talks Summer Learning, Mental Health, and State Tests
In an interview after a school reopening summit, the education secretary also addressed teachers' union concerns about CDC guidance.
10 min read
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks during a press briefing at the White House on March 17, 2021.
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona speaks during a press briefing at the White House on March 17.
Andrew Harnik/AP
Federal Senators Press Deputy Education Secretary Nominee on School Closures, Lost Learning Time
If confirmed, San Diego Unified Superintendent Cindy Marten would be the Education Department's number two as it urges in-person learning.
5 min read
San Diego Unified School District Superintendent Cindy Marten speaks at Lincoln High School in San Diego during the State of the District Address on Oct. 20, 2015.
San Diego Unified School District Superintendent Cindy Marten would be second in command at the U.S. Department of Education if confirmed as deputy secretary.
Misael Virgen/San Diego Union-Tribune