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N.J. Schools Can Bring Alleged Bullies Into Lawsuit

By The Associated Press — April 01, 2014 1 min read
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Eleven students and their parents have been brought into a suit filed by a New Jersey teenager who accused two districts of not doing enough to stop eight years of bullying.

A judge this month allowed them to become third-party defendants. The judge and lawyers say it’s the first time a New Jersey judge has been asked by a district to add students as defendants in a bullying case.

A lawyer for one of the districts said that adding the alleged bullies as defendants puts the district in a favorable posture because it shows that officials responded appropriately to all reported instances of bullying.

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A version of this article appeared in the April 02, 2014 edition of Education Week as N.J. Schools Can Bring Alleged Bullies Into Lawsuit

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