School & District Management

Sessions Repeats ‘Lock Her Up’ Chant at Summit for Conservative Students

By The Associated Press — July 24, 2018 1 min read
In this July 13, 2018, photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivers remarks in Portland, Maine. Sessions laughed off and repeated a "Lock Her Up" chant at a speech at a high school leadership summit. Sessions was speaking Tuesday in Washington, D.C, when members of the audience interrupted him with cries of "Lock Her Up."

Washington

Attorney General Jeff Sessions laughed off and repeated a “Lock Her Up” chant during a speech Tuesday at a high school leadership summit.

Sessions was speaking at a gathering organized by Turning Point USA, a nonprofit that promotes conservative ideals on college campuses, when members of the audience interrupted him with cries of “Lock Her Up.”

The chant refers to Hillary Clinton, President Donald Trump’s opponent in the 2016 president election. It was a staple of Trump campaign rallies as the FBI investigated Clinton’s use of a private email server and remains prevalent at some Trump events.

Sessions, the country’s chief law enforcement officer, chuckled at the chant Tuesday, repeated the words once and noted how he had heard that same call during the campaign.

The chant came as Sessions lamented that college campuses were “coddling” students by encouraging them to stymie rather than engage with speech or points of view they disagree with.

“Rather than molding a generation of mature and well-informed adults, some schools are doing everything they can to create a generation of sanctimonious, sensitive, supercilious snowflakes,” Sessions said.

The attorney general said that after the 2016 presidential election, students at some campuses held “cry-ins,” were encouraged to draw their feelings or were given Play-Doh, coloring books and therapy dogs.

“I can tell that this group isn’t going to have to have Play-Doh when you get attacked in college,” Sessions said. “When you get involved in a debate, you’re going to stand up and defend yourselves and the values you believe in.”

“I like this bunch—I got to tell you, you’re not going to be backing down. Go get ‘em, go get ‘em” he added.

Seconds later, the “Lock Her Up” chants broke out.

A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment.

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