School & District Management Interactive

Map: Coronavirus and School Closures in 2019-2020

March 06, 2020 | Updated: September 16, 2020 2 min read

Looking for information about the 2020-21 school year? Education Week is tracking where schools are currently open or closed due to COVID-19 here: Map: Where Has COVID-19 Closed Schools? Where Are They Open?

The coronavirus pandemic forced a near-total shutdown of school buildings in the spring of 2020—an historic upheaval of K-12 schooling in the United States.
Education Week tracked and documented the closures—first at the school district level and ultimately, state-by-state, from March 6 to May 15. We will no longer update this page.

At their peak, the closures affected at least 55.1 million students in 124,000 U.S. public and private schools. Nearly every state either ordered or recommended that schools remain closed through the end of the 2019-20 school year.

For more information, see our detailed coverage of the pandemic and its impact on schools.

State-by-State Map of 2019-2020 School-Building Closures

Zoom in to see the status of individual states. Click a state to view more details.

Sources: Staff reporting; National Center for Education Statistics; government websites and communications | Click here to view enlarged map

States That Didn’t Order or Recommend School Buildings Closed for the Academic Year

As of May 15, 2020, How Much Longer Were School Buildings Scheduled to Remain Closed?

American SamoaClosed Until Further Notice
Bureau of Indian EducationVaries by School/District
MontanaVaries by School/District
WyomingVaries by School/District

State Data

Explore the table below for detailed information about closures at the state level.

Download the Data

Note: Historical data includes school- and district-level data collected from 3/9/2020 to 3/25/2020 and state-level data as of 5/15/2020.

Corrections will be made as we learn of them, and will be included in the next update.

Education Week would like to know how you are using our map of school building closures and reopening timelines. Please share how this information is helping you by emailing library@educationweek.org.

Related

Contact Information

For media or research inquiries about this map and data, contact library@educationweek.org. To contribute data or information, use the comments below.

How to Cite This Map

Map: Coronavirus and School Closures (2020, March 6). Education Week. Retrieved Month Day, Year from https://www.edweek.org/leadership/map-coronavirus-and-school-closures-in-2019-2020/2020/03

Data Note

All numbers for student enrollment and schools are from the National Center for Education Statistics. Total U.S. public and private school enrollments reflect NCES’ 2019 projections. Student enrollments in the state-level table and map are NCES’ Fall 2016 data for public schools and Fall 2017 data for private schools. Numbers of schools in the state-level table and map are NCES’ data for 2016-17 for public schools and Fall 2017 for private schools. In each case, we’re using the latest NCES data that’s available. School and enrollment numbers for the Department of Defense Education Activity were provided by the agency and are from 2020.

Reporting/Analysis: Holly Peele & Maya Riser-Kositsky, with contributions from Education Week staff
Design/Visualization: Hyon-Young Kim, with contributions from Education Week staff

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