March 8, 2017

Education Week, Vol. 36, Issue 24
Reading & Literacy Kindergartners Enter More Ready in Math and Literacy, Researchers Say
Teachers in 2010 reported stronger academic skills among children entering school that year than did teachers in 1998, researchers at the University of Virginia and Stanford University found.
March 7, 2017
Which States Are Ready for ESSA? Some states appear more prepared to implement ESSA than others, writes researchers Priscilla Wohlstetter, Darius R. Brown, and Megan Duff.
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Every Student Succeeds Act Opinion Which States Are Ready for ESSA?
Some states appear more prepared to implement ESSA than others, writes researchers Priscilla Wohlstetter, Darius R. Brown, and Megan Duff.
Priscilla Wohlstetter, Darius R. Brown & Megan Duff, March 7, 2017
5 min read
College- and Career-Readiness Education Isn’t Everything: Low voter turnout underscores why schools must do more to prepare students to be engaged citizens, argues Sidney Trubowitz.
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College & Workforce Readiness Opinion College- and Career-Readiness Education Isn't Everything
Low voter turnout underscores why schools must do more to prepare students to be engaged citizens, argues Sidney Trubowitz.
Sidney Trubowitz, March 7, 2017
4 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
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Assessment Opinion The Unmet Need for Interdisciplinary Education
Educators must build bridges between subjects rather than jealously guard their area of expertise, writes educator Alden S. Blodget.
Alden S. Blodget, March 7, 2017
4 min read
When 'Highly Qualified' Teachers Aren’t: When it comes to teacher certification, the label “highly qualified” doesn’t mean much, argues University of Oklahoma’s Lawrence Baines.
Cari Vander Yacht for Education Week
Federal Opinion When 'Highly Qualified' Teachers Aren't
When it comes to teacher certification, the label "highly qualified" doesn’t mean much, argues University of Oklahoma’s Lawrence Baines.
Lawrence Baines, March 7, 2017
4 min read
School & District Management Feuding Superintendents and School Boards Struggle to Make Amends
As battles move into court or the public sphere, it's very hard for schools chiefs and their boards to find a way to work together effectively.
Francisco Vara-Orta, March 7, 2017
5 min read
Denisha Merriweather, center, whose family took advantage of a tax-credit scholarship program in Florida so that the could attend a Christian school in Jacksonville, is acknowledged by President Donald Trump during his address to a joint session of Congress in Washington.
Denisha Merriweather, center, whose family took advantage of a tax-credit scholarship program in Florida so that the could attend a Christian school in Jacksonville, is acknowledged by President Donald Trump during his address to a joint session of Congress in Washington.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
Every Student Succeeds Act As Trump Renews Push for School Choice, Specifics Still Scarce
In his first address to a joint session of Congress, President Donald Trump makes clear that he remains serious in concept about his pledge to expand school choice.
Alyson Klein, March 7, 2017
6 min read
U.S. Secretary of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos waits for the arrival of President Donald Trump at a meeting of the National Governors Association last week at the White House.
U.S. Secretary of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos waits for the arrival of President Donald Trump at a meeting of the National Governors Association last week at the White House.
Evan Vucci/AP
Every Student Succeeds Act Transition Update: Washington
DeVos slammed for remarks on HBCU's, a new Senate measure could overturn Obama-era ESSA rules on accountability, and more.
March 7, 2017
5 min read
Accountability A-F School Rankings Draw Local Pushback
Critics, including some local superintendents, call a method adopted by at least 18 states simplistic, while backers see it as transparent and easy for the public to grasp.
Daarel Burnette II, March 7, 2017
7 min read
President Donald Trump walks on stage upon his arrival aboard the nuclear aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford on March 2 in Newport, Va. Trump's plan to boost defense spending by $54 billion and make corresponding domestic cuts may put a new squeeze on U.S. Department of Education funding.
President Donald Trump walks on stage upon his arrival aboard the nuclear aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford on March 2 in Newport, Va. Trump's plan to boost defense spending by $54 billion and make corresponding domestic cuts may put a new squeeze on U.S. Department of Education funding.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
Education Funding Federal Budget Knife Could Slash Into K-12 Programs
President Donald Trump's plan to boost defense spending by $54 billion and make corresponding domestic cuts may put a new squeeze on U.S. Department of Education funding.
Andrew Ujifusa, March 7, 2017
4 min read
Federal Schools Are Falling Short for Many English-Learners
In a National Academies report on the state of education for ELLs, one theme is consistent: public schools need more resources and research.
Corey Mitchell, March 7, 2017
6 min read
Resident teacher intern Marliss Platt teaches a 7th grade English class at the Great Oaks Charter School in Wilmington, Del. She finds the technology especially useful for getting tips on solving classroom problems.
Resident teacher intern Marliss Platt teaches a 7th grade English class at the Great Oaks Charter School in Wilmington, Del. She finds the technology especially useful for getting tips on solving classroom problems.
Charles Mostoller for Education Week
Teacher Preparation Video Links Professors to Far-Flung Student-Teachers
A handful of education schools are using the technology to provide feedback to teaching candidates in residence at schools throughout the country.
Brenda Iasevoli, March 7, 2017
6 min read
Texas high school wrestler Mack Beggs is announced as the winner of a semifinal match of a wrestling tournament at Allen High School in Allen, Texas. Beggs, a transgender boy, has been undergoing hormone therapy as he transitions from female to male. The governing body that oversees Texas high school sports requires Beggs to wrestle in the girls' division because of its rule that restricts sports participation based on the sex listed on an athlete's birth certificate.
Texas high school wrestler Mack Beggs is announced as the winner of a semifinal match of a wrestling tournament at Allen High School in Allen, Texas. Beggs, a transgender boy, has been undergoing hormone therapy as he transitions from female to male. The governing body that oversees Texas high school sports requires Beggs to wrestle in the girls' division because of its rule that restricts sports participation based on the sex listed on an athlete's birth certificate.
Nathan Hunsinger/The Dallas Morning News via AP
Equity & Diversity How Many Transgender Children Are There?
Researchers estimate that about 0.7 percent of U.S. teens identify as transgender, but they acknowledge that far better data are needed.
Evie Blad, March 7, 2017
4 min read
School & District Management Report Roundup Becoming Principal: Whose Route Is Shortest?
A report from the Girl Scout Research Institute finds that girls with lower socioeconomic status participate in extracurricular activities less often than their more-affluent peers.
Sarah D. Sparks, March 7, 2017
1 min read
School Climate & Safety Report Roundup Television Time
Young children who watch television more than two hours a day show decreased skills in math and executive functioning—the collective term for cognitive abilities related to attention, focus, and self-control—with low- income children faring the worst compared with those from higher-income families who viewed the same amount of TV, concludes a new study.
Christina A. Samuels, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Professional Development Report Roundup Early Childhood
Children enrolled for a year in an enhanced Head Start program known as Educare show better results on tests of auditory and expressive-language skills, parent-reported problem behaviors, and parent-child interactions than those who were not able to enroll in the program, a study finds.
Christina A. Samuels, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Student Well-Being Report Roundup Youth Development
A report from the Girl Scout Research Institute finds that girls with lower socioeconomic status participate in extracurricular activities less often than their more-affluent peers.
Marva Hinton, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Teaching Profession Report Roundup Teachers
The Louisiana legislature's move to weaken teacher tenure in 2012 led to the loss of up to 1,700 public school teachers over the next two years, according to a study by the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans at Tulane University.
Brenda Iasevoli, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Teaching Profession Report Roundup School Schedules
Much of a teacher's day is devoted to instruction, with precious little time set aside for collaborating with colleagues, planning lessons, or reflecting on practice, says a report from the Center for American Progress.
Brenda Iasevoli, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Federal Letter to the Editor K-12 Scholarship's Leftward Tilt Is No Surprise and Not a Concern
To the Editor:
Frederick M. Hess is right when he notes in his recent Commentary ("Its Leftward Tilt Leaves Ed. Scholarship on the Sidelines," Jan. 11, 2017) that America's colleges and universities lean heavily to the left. That should not be surprising.
March 7, 2017
2 min read
School Choice & Charters Letter to the Editor Reader: Commentary Adds to Charter School 'Mythology'
To the Editor:
The recent Commentary "Untie Charters' Bureaucratic Strings" by Jeanne Allen (Feb. 8, 2017) is another addition to the mythology about charter schools, which the author believes are "suffering from regulatory strangulation." To the contrary, any time you have a multi-billion-dollar industry—such as charters—that is largely without transparency and accountability, you are asking for problems.
March 7, 2017
1 min read
College & Workforce Readiness News in Brief 'Nudge' Letters Help Cut Chronic Absenteeism
In Tacoma, Wash., and 16 other cities across the nation, districts are boosting student attendance by sending home what they call "nudge" letters when students miss too many days of school.
Tribune News Service, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act News in Brief California Refuses Request to Swap State Test for SAT
California last week became the first state to reject a request to use a new kind of testing flexibility offered under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
Catherine Gewertz, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Education News in Brief Texas District Apologizes for Comments on Hijabs
A Houston-area school district is apologizing after an administrator told Muslim students they need to obtain permission from an imam to wear hijabs in school.
The Associated Press, March 7, 2017
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief District Led Investigation Into Locker-Room Assault
An investigation into the sexual assault of a black football player with disabilities by his white teammates at a small-town Idaho high school showed that crucial evidence was collected by school employees, not law-enforcement officials.
The Associated Press, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Equity & Diversity News in Brief N.C. Board Rejects Ban on Confederate Flags
A North Carolina school board has voted not to ban the Confederate flag from school grounds, rejecting two pleas from a local chapter of the NAACP to establish the policy.
The Associated Press, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Ed-Tech Policy News in Brief Snap IPO Yields Millions for Private Calif. High School
A California high school has made millions of dollars from the initial public offering of shares in Snap Inc., the company behind the Snapchat photo-messaging application.
The Associated Press, March 7, 2017
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief Website Claims Spur Threats Against Ga. Superintendent
The schools superintendent of DeKalb County, Ga., says he and his family have received death threats after a conservative news and opinion website published a story saying the district prohibits "pro-Trump immigration rhetoric."
Corey Mitchell, March 7, 2017
1 min read
Education Funding News in Brief Kansas Supreme Court Rules K-12 Funding System Inadequate
The Kansas supreme court ruled last week that the level of state funding for public schools is inadequate and does not square with the state constitution, giving state lawmakers until the end of June to respond.
Andrew Ujifusa, March 7, 2017
1 min read