Issues

October 5, 2016

Education Week, Vol. 36, Issue 07
Equity & Diversity Having the Difficult Race-Bias Conversation
In the first weeks of the school year, fatal police shootings have once again raised deep concerns about the relationships between police officers and communities of color. Such events can be difficult to process and discuss for both students and educators.
Kate Stoltzfus, October 5, 2016
1 min read
School Climate & Safety Shorter School Grade Spans Linked to Bullying
A study of New York city schools finds that students are more likely to see bullying in 6-8 or 5-8 schools than in 6-12 or K-12 schools.
Sarah D. Sparks, October 4, 2016
5 min read
Yong Kim/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP
Edwin Lopez (No. 1) stands while most of his teammates kneel during the national anthem before Woodrow Wilson High School’s home game against Highland High School in Camden, N.J., last month. Colin Kaepernick’s protest against social injustices has sparked debate on a national level about patriotism and free speech.
Yong Kim/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP
Law & Courts Taking a Stand: How Schools Should Respond to National-Anthem Protests
A First Amendment expert says K-12 officials can't discipline students for acts of protest that don't disrupt school operations.
Evie Blad, October 4, 2016
5 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Storm Clouds Over Ed-Tech Law's Renewal
Despite a late, bipartisan push, momentum seems to have stalled in the U.S. Senate on the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act.
Andrew Ujifusa, October 4, 2016
5 min read
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., waves with his wife, Anne Holton, during the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on July 27, 2016.
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
Federal Personal Lens: A VP Nominee's Spouse on Education
Anne Holton, whose husband, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, is Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's running mate, is Virginia's former education secretary and a campaign ambassador.
Alyson Klein, October 4, 2016
4 min read
Lora Reyes supervises children at her licensed child-care operation in Westfield, Mass. GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump favors a new tax deduction for child-care costs.
Lora Reyes supervises children at her licensed child-care operation in Westfield, Mass. GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump favors a new tax deduction for child-care costs.
M. Scott Brauer for Education Week-File
Federal Appraising Trump's School Choice, Child-Care Plans
While advocates and experts are pleased GOP nominee Donald Trump has weighed in on those topics, many of them question the specifics or want more detail.
Andrew Ujifusa, October 4, 2016
6 min read
School & District Management Data Tool Allows City-by-City Schooling Comparisons
A website created for civic leaders and the public offers a collection of education data for 114 cities in 49 states and the District of Columbia.
Denisa R. Superville, October 4, 2016
5 min read
Equity & Diversity New Teachers Make Up a Significant Segment of Profession
New data show that 12 percent of all U.S. public school teachers are in their first or second year, raising questions about the overall stability of the teaching force.
Stephen Sawchuk & Anthony Rebora, October 4, 2016
8 min read
The Empathy Gap and How to Fill It: Teachers, parents, and schools leaders have a role in fostering student empathy, particularly when children are very young, writes Jessica Sager.
Getty
Equity & Diversity Opinion The Empathy Gap and How to Fill It
Teachers, parents, and school leaders have a role in fostering student empathy, particularly when children are very young, writes Jessica Sager.
Jessica Sager, October 4, 2016
3 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Letter to the Editor 'Thoughtful Guidance' Critical for Course-Credit Transfer
"Maybe for the author, bullied kids are just collateral damage, but for the parents, they are victims. Bullying is violent behavior, and the victims carry the scars for the rest of their lives. Maybe that's something Mr. Kohn needs to consider, instead of inviting us to 'understand' the poor misunderstood bullies and blame ourselves for their behavior." — mcruiz
October 4, 2016
2 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Letter to the Editor The Importance of Gauging Rigor To Demonstrate Meaningful Results
To the Editor:
The recent article "Are Dual-Enrollment Programs Being Oversold?" (Sept. 7, 2016) highlights the difficulties of transferring credits earned in high school dual-enrollment programs to a student's chosen college destination. But it misses the bigger point of whether those credits should transfer.
October 4, 2016
1 min read
Law & Courts Nevada High Court Deals Blow to School Choice Program
The state’s Supreme Court strikes down the funding mechanism for Nevada’s groundbreaking education savings account program, a little more than a year after lawmakers enacted it.
Arianna Prothero, October 4, 2016
3 min read
College & Workforce Readiness SAT Scores Dip in SAT Transition Year
But scores are yet to be released for the revised college-admission exam, introduced in March.
Catherine Gewertz, October 4, 2016
5 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act New Effort to Promote Social-Emotional Learning in Schools
A multiyear endeavor organized by the Aspen Institute seeks to help schools better teach social and emotional skills alongside traditional academic subjects.
Evie Blad, October 4, 2016
3 min read
The three contenders for governor in Indiana, Democrat John Gregg, left, Libertarian Rex Bell, center, and Republican Lt. Gov. Eric Holcomb debate at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis. Testing was prime topic in the square-off.
The three contenders for governor in Indiana, Democrat John Gregg, left, Libertarian Rex Bell, center, and Republican Lt. Gov. Eric Holcomb debate at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis. Testing was prime topic in the square-off.
Darron Cummings/AP
School & District Management Indiana Testing Woes Fuel Electoral Battles
Political heartburn continues in the Hoosier State over high-stakes assessments, with the issue spilling over into this year's contests for governor and state schools superintendent.
Daarel Burnette II, October 4, 2016
6 min read
Trust Is Missing From School-Improvement Efforts: Distrust among school leaders and educators can depress teacher retention and harm students, writes Dana Barlin.
Getty
Recruitment & Retention Opinion Trust Is Missing From School-Improvement Efforts
Distrust among school leaders and educators can depress teacher retention and harm students, writes Dara Barlin.
Dara Barlin, October 4, 2016
4 min read
Curriculum Fedex Targeted in Open Educational Resources Lawsuit
The legal action—which focuses on academic content licensing, royalties, and photocopying—has potentially big implications for the use of open educational resources in schools.
Sean Cavanagh, October 4, 2016
5 min read
Classroom Technology News in Brief No Lockers for Students In New School Buildings
A middle school under construction in Horry County, S.C., will have 48 classrooms, a gym, and a cafeteria, but no lockers.
The Associated Press, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Student Well-Being News in Brief Oregon District to Allow Satanic After-School Club
The Portland, Ore., chapter of the Satanic Temple has been approved to bring an after-school program to an elementary school in the city.
The Associated Press, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Education News in Brief Moody's Pushes Down Chicago's Credit Rating
Moody's Investors Service pushed the debt of the Chicago public schools further into junk territory on the same day last week the district's teachers threatened to strike.
The Associated Press, October 4, 2016
1 min read
School & District Management Report Roundup Poll: Dual Enrollment Vs. College-Ready
Students are flocking to dual-enrollment programs, hoping they'll get a bigger academic challenge and maybe sock away some college credits, too. But the superintendents overseeing those programs aren't universally convinced that earning college credit means students are ready for college.
Catherine Gewertz, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Michael Martirano
Michael Martirano
School & District Management News in Brief Transitions
Michael Martirano, the state schools superintendent in West Virginia, will resign his post come June 30 to move closer to his family in Maryland.
October 4, 2016
1 min read
Assessment Report Roundup Teacher Quality
When an effective teacher joins a grade-level teaching team, student learning improves across the board as other teachers in the grade raise their game, finds a study of Miami-Dade County, Fla., schools.
Madeline Will, October 4, 2016
1 min read
English-Language Learners Report Roundup English-Language Learners
A University of Oregon study has found that designating early-elementary students who are close to being proficient in English as English-language learners may actually do more harm than good.
Corey Mitchell, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Teaching Profession Report Roundup School Staffing
Teachers who are hired when the school year is in full swing are not as effective as those hired before classes begin, a new study finds.
Brenda Iasevoli, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Professional Development Report Roundup Teacher Learning
Fourth grade math teachers who took content-intensive professional development improved their own general math knowledge, but those gains did not trickle down to students, according to a federal study released last week.
Liana Loewus, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Equity & Diversity News in Brief U.S. Faults Boston Latin On Handling of Racial Issues
Officials at the nation's first and oldest public school didn't sufficiently investigate racially charged incidents and failed to address racial hostility, a federal civil rights probe concluded last week.
The Associated Press, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Ed-Tech Policy News in Brief Ohio Cyber Charter Found To Inflate Attendance
Just 41 percent of the 15,000 students at Ohio's largest online charter school do enough work to be considered full-time students, a state education department audit finds.
Benjamin Herold, October 4, 2016
1 min read
Law & Courts News in Brief Calif. Districts Can Ignore Tying Scores to Reviews
A California court has handed Students Matter, the group behind the high-profile Vergara v. California teacher-tenure case, yet another defeat in its quest to upend laws that the group says keep bad teachers in the classroom.
Emmanuel Felton, October 4, 2016
1 min read