February 13, 2019

This Issue
Vol. 38, Issue 21
toc cover
Past Issues

For past issues, select from the drop-down menu.

In Denver, teachers will go on strike Monday to protest a performance-pay system that’s been in place for 15 years. The dispute is illustrative of a larger national shift away from differentiated pay.
Nearly a year later, the March for Our Lives movement can point to electoral and legislative wins and losses, some converts, and some dropouts. Can they keep it going?
Despite harsh criticism from President Trump, shrinking job prospects, and safety threats, student interest in journalism has risen or held steady in many high schools, a new survey shows.
Public school advocates have a long wish list even as state policymakers weigh whether to fatten "rainy day" funds instead of pumping surplus cash into schools.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Obituary
News in Brief
From kindergarten to high school, teachers are using student-made podcasts to nurture students' reading, writing, and interviewing skills.
It may take years for the state to disentangle itself from the Common Core State Standards and put new ones in place.
Education Week asked those involved in issues of safety, guns, and youth engagement how Parkland has changed the debate. And we asked those directly affected by the shooting how it continues to shape their lives.
The media loves stories about wealthy parents keeping their kids off screens. Experts, evidence, and educators from Beverly Hills to Greenwich, Conn. paint a different picture.
A restive Democratic base could put presidential hopefuls like Sens. Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, and Elizabeth Warren on the hot seat over issues such as school choice, corporate involvement in schools, and the connection between education and criminal justice.
Though the Supreme Court refused this particular case, some see an opening for future challenges involving First Amendment issues and public employees.
After campaigning on the expansion of preschool and other early-childhood programs, governors in California, Colorado, and elsewhere are reflecting those priorities in their budget pitches.
The $250 million pot of federal money helps pay for strategic planning in early-childhood education systems, but the program's undergone some revisions.
Buoyed by budget surpluses and prodded by teacher activism and legal challenges, legislators and governors are gearing up to tackle long-outdated K-12 funding formulas.
The U.S. Department of Education sees two specific challenges potentially undermining the quality of the international assessment program, writes Mark Schneider.
In a response to the U.S. Dept. of Ed., PISA’s Governing Board chair argues that its testing cycle should be accelerated.
Educators still have a lot to learn from the now-infamous videos of Covington Catholic High School students, says Rebecca Nagle.
Letters
The popular trend of teaching grit is actually the education equivalent of "The Hunger Games," argues Bettina L. Love.

FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 04/12/2018)



REPRINT THIS REPORT
Want to purchase print or digital copies of this report to share with your colleagues or students?
Contact [email protected].

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented