July 18, 2018

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Vol. 37, Issue 37
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Nearly half of K-12 teachers and administrators report that they've experienced or witnessed sexual harassment or assault while at work, in a new Education Week Research Center survey.
At a time of sharp political divisions, civics teaches students how to engage in civil discourse, according to school leaders interviewed for the Education Week Research Center poll. More than half said their students don’t get enough of it.
Within days of the Supreme Court’s decision to abolish union fees for nonmembers, conservative groups—including ones with ties to Ed. Secretary Betsy DeVos—launched email, social media, and billboard campaigns to try to convince teachers not to join their unions.
New smart speakers like Amazon's Alexa can help support classroom teachers, but they also spark "Big Brother"-style worries.
Education Week is tracking a new wave of activism in which teachers are filing to run for their state legislatures—and the numbers are impressive.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Obituary
A push to get a federal court to recognize a constitutional right to education continues, despite last month's dismissal of a Detroit right-to-read case.
Here's a look at the official education requirements for children being detained, the qualifications for those being hired to provide these children with classroom instruction, and more.
An evaluation of a multi-year effort by the Gates Foundation to improve teaching, which cost $575 million, found no evidence the program improved student outcomes or gave low-income and minority students greater access to effective teachers.
Teacher and other public employee unions can’t collect agency fees from nonmembers, the court ruled in the Janus case, a decision that could hurt unions' revenue and membership numbers.
Despite leaders' messages of defiance and solidarity, reminders of the Supreme Court's recent decision to abolish agency fees—and its financial implications for teachers' unions—were everywhere at the National Education Association's yearly convention.
High school and college students are less likely to volunteer or give to charity today than they were 15 years ago, an analysis of U.S. Census data finds.
In its quest to cut red tape, the administration has its eyes set on regulations meant to steer youths and adults with disabilities to jobs where they work alongside those without disabilities.
The guidance emphasized permissible ways for schools and colleges to take race into account to promote student diversity, a subject the U.S. Supreme Court has had much to say about.
A highly influential moderate-conservative at the center of the U.S. Supreme Court for three decades, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote major opinions on race, religion, and other areas of public education.
The just-concluded U.S. Supreme Court term included a blockbuster union rights ruling, the announced retirement of a justice influential on education issues, and a variety of rulings with relevance for K-12.
A federal appeals court judge in Washington whose mother taught in the District of Columbia, Kavanaugh has a relatively light record of rulings on education. If confirmed, he would succeed Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.
Here's a breakdown of what could happen to key Education Department offices if the Trump administration's plan to combine the two agencies ever gets off the ground.
Legislation advances on career and technical education and on spending for the U.S. Department of Education, along with confirmation of key personnel.
Following a trip to Europe, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos reflects on how we should restructure education at home.
In the face of well-funded opposition to organized labor, teachers will not be silenced, writes NEA President Lily Eskelsen García.
The Janus ruling and subsequent attempts to "defang" unions offer opportunities as well as threats, writes AFT President Randi Weingarten.
Letters
Where children live still largely determines their education options. But a dramatic shift is already under way, write Mark A. Elgart and Belle S. Wheelan.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 04/12/2018)

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