May 16, 2018

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 31
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A trove of federal civil rights data has, for the first time, captured a snapshot of the controversial practice of paddling of preschoolers in the nation's public schools.
The school system is taking a "continuous improvement" approach to ironing out the kinks in a sweeping rollout of discipline reforms aimed at curbing school suspensions.
Fresh off a wave of strikes and protests in several states, education activists aim to turn that momentum into electoral victories in this fall's midterm elections.
An oft-cited misconception of the longevity of urban schools chiefs is being debunked by a new look at the data on superintendent tenure.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Obituary
In a new Request for Information, two of the most powerful groups in education philanthropy jointly seek ideas to improve students' math and writing skills, and "executive functions."
In states with recent strikes and protests, individual teachers—some of them in their 20's and most of them with little or no organizing experience—have taken charge of the grassroots push for higher pay and more school funding.
Many teenagers spend significant time managing how they present themselves on social media and are concerned about the digital trails they leave, a researcher explains.
Federal aid offers a lifeline for local programs providing after-school programming, but providers remain concerned about the future of the $1.2 billion 21st Century Community Learning Center program.
The White House is aiming to cut the money, mostly from unobligated funds, as part of a broader effort to reduce government spending.
The Oklahoma teacher walkouts show the value in airing a state’s “dirty laundry” in public, write two civic educators.
Race to the Top is over, but the initiative is still driving teacher-evaluation policies and priorities, write two professors.
When teachers use their students as leverage, they damage their own professionalism, write William J. Bennett and Karen Nussle.
Letters
Many teachers have long tended to avoid activism, but that is changing, writes veteran educator Paula Reed.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 04/12/2018)

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