April 18, 2018

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 28
toc cover
Past Issues

For past issues, select from the drop-down menu.

While mass shootings dominate headlines, smaller incidents of gun violence in school can also traumatize students and staff and upend their sense of safety, as one teacher learned firsthand.
The pressure to rein in costly retirement systems could put more states in the center of policy fights like the one that sparked teacher walkouts in Kentucky.
The staff at iLEAD Academy knows which jobs are in demand locally and how much they pay—and they make sure that students know, too, as they weigh college and career.
An Education Week review shows that few states plan to take advantage of opportunities in the Every Student Succeeds Act to bolster various forms of school choice.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Obituary
Studies on school discipline policies that disadvantage some groups of students over others were a recurring theme at last week's American Educational Research Association meeting. Here is what researchers found.
In a late-night announcement on Thursday, officials from the Arizona Education Association and organizers of the grassroots group Arizona Educators United announced a walkout would take place starting April 26.
During an emotional public safety forum in Broward County, Fla., shaken students and enraged parents and educators demanded fixes for what they consider lax security, district indifference, and failure to act to prevent the mass shooting that killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.
Amid worries about digital distractions and "fake news," more than half of students scored "high" or above on a new international assessment of internet reading skills.
As achievement continues to flatten on NAEP, the gap is widening between the lowest and highest scorers on the nationally representative reading and math tests.
Johnny Collett’s selection to oversee special education for the U.S. Department of Education was a rare point of agreement between the Trump administration and the disability-advocacy community.
Some states have been told they’ll need to change the way they assess students with severe cognitive disabilities because of changes under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
Federal lawmakers, especially some from Florida, hear from school officials, educators, and students about ways to secure schools and empower students and staff against school violence.
Teachers must reject the idea that math is like eating vegetables, says former offensive lineman and current mathematician John Urschel.
It's time to elevate family structure as an influential factor in academic success, argues Fordham Institute fellow Ian Rowe.
It’s not just low wages that put a financial strain on teachers, write two Rutgers researchers. Rising health insurance costs take a toll too.
Betsy DeVos and other political leaders have lost sight of the audacious Reagan-era goal to revitalize education, writes Thomas Toch.

Technology Counts 2018: What Do Principals Believe?

This year’s report takes a hard look at what principals are thinking and doing about some of the most vexing technology issues in their schools.

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented