February 14, 2018

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 20
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In the 2015-16 school year, more than 200,000 teachers were physically attacked by a student. But assaults on teachers can have lasting effects.
Five months after Hurricane Maria disrupted the island’s already struggling schools, education leaders disagree about how to get the system back on track.
School districts with large Puerto Rican communities are hiring bilingual staff and monitoring student evacuees for signs of trauma.
With the Janus Supreme Court case looming, teachers' unions are knocking on doors to try to boost membership and mitigate financial loss.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
In South Carolina and elsewhere, new concierge services are smoothing the way for businesses and schools to create real-world work opportunities for students.
A national program is working with teachers around the country to persuade students that reciting other people's poetry can be as transformative as performing their own.
Technology companies are making a push to integrate virtual reality into K-12, but experts are raising concerns about how it might affect children.
Teachers and other public-worker unions have long fought "right-to-work" advocates over collecting fees from nonmembers, spawning a string of legal precedents.
One isolated, the other in town, the two schools share a host of challenges in an area of the island hardest hit by Hurricane Maria five months ago.
Lawmakers around the country are wrestling not only with how much money states should be be providing in school aid but how it should be distributed.
In a discussion with reporters, the education secretary talked about her plans for "rethinking" schools, deregulation, implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act, what's next on school choice, and more.
As the White House pledges a big push to rebuild the national infrastructure, education advocates push for money to rebuild and refurbish aging, substandard schools.
When it comes to state ESSA plans, it’s up to the public to hold leaders accountable, write two former ed. policymakers.
Early education in public schools is growing in popularity, but principals require more training to better serve their youngest students, writes Suzanne Bouffard.
Misdiagnosing and mistreating the common learning disorder has serious consequences for millions of children, writes one concerned parent.
Letters
Without rigorous research that accurately reflects the current population, early education won't deliver for all students, write two education researchers.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 10/20/2017)

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