December 13, 2017

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Vol. 37, Issue 15
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Experts and policymakers offer differing thoughts on the reasons behind the recent rises in high school graduation rates, which are affecting students from nearly every racial and income group and those with disabilities.
Despite strong opinions and partisan viewpoints, an Education Week Research Center survey shows teachers, principals, and administrators working to keep those divisions out of the classroom.
Across California, school districts are shifting from at-large elections to single-member districts to make it easier for Latinos and other minority communities to elect candidates to local offices.
The shift of more than a quarter of the state’s local school board races to partisan ones in recent years has some cheering it could increase voter transparency, while others warn it could shrink representation for minorities.
See snapshots from our national survey of educators on the following topics:
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
The latest results from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study show that basic literacy is at an all-time high around the world, while the reading skills of U.S. 4th graders seem to be heading in the opposite direction.
States don't do enough to inform parents about the rights they lose when they enroll children in private schools using vouchers, the GAO finds.
Charter schools are among the nation's most segregated, an Associated Press analysis finds—an outcome at odds, critics say, with their goal of offering a better alternative to failing traditional public schools.
The Federal Trade Commission and the Education Department recently held a meeting to discuss fundamental data-privacy questions facing K-12 schools.
The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2013 ruling in Shelby County, Ala. v. Holder gutted a portion of the 1956 Voting Rights Act, and the reverberations continue for school board and other local elections.
Public education advocates lobby against GOP proposals with funding implications, while some school choice advocates celebrate elements that could boost private school options.
The Trump administration's picks to head up two key positions in the Department of Education face tough questions from Democrats on Capitol Hill.
The state's Republican governor is in a pitched battle with the state's educators over the process he used to fire Missouri's commissioner of education.
Republicans in Congress want to simplify student aid forms in their rewrite of the Higher Education Act. But they also would end student-loan forgiveness programs that help some teachers, and would shut off funding for teacher-preparation programs.
AI could materially improve education—if educators and policymakers start answering some tough questions today, urges Michael Bennett.
Flipping the curriculum and updating the goals of education could prepare us for the artificial-intelligence era, writes Charles Fadel.
Could engaging traditionally underrepresented students in AI development save us from a dystopia? Tess Posner makes the case.
As new technology shakes up the workforce, we must empower students to take control of their own learning, writes Milton Chen.
Letters
Letters
Getting ready for an unknown future of employment means unlearning what we know about education, writes Christopher Dede.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 10/20/2017)

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