November 1, 2017

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 11
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The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s $1.7 billion pledge last week is just the latest iteration of a K-12 funding strategy for an influential philanthropy that has shifted more than once over two decades.
The secretary of education’s move to scrap what it says are outdated and burdensome regulations smacks up against fears that it will scale back protections for students with disabilities.
Fewer freshmen are failing at Summit High School, thanks to a program that trains juniors and seniors to mentor younger peers.
In Chesterfield County, Va., and other districts, educators are borrowing a project-management approach from the world of software development: "Scrum" meetings.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Post-hurricane recovery remains especially difficult outside major urban areas even as Congress and federal officials continue to work out aid packages.
A first-of-its-kind analysis suggests a link between student achievement and the degree to which teachers have a role in school decisionmaking.
Hundreds of state and local efforts to connect rural schools to fiber-optic networks have run into roadblocks over the past two years.
If confirmed to be U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' right-hand man, former South Carolina schools chief Mick Zais would share her support for school choice and a slimmer federal footprint in K-12.
Some civil rights advocates look askance at Arizona's plan to weigh test scores differently depending on how long a student has been at a particular school.
The Trump administration has picked the leader of a group that advocates for the civil rights of the Jewish community to hold the top civil rights post under U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.
Students have a First Amendment right to protest—without getting kicked off their football team, writes attorney Frank D. LoMonte.
How school leaders should embrace conversations about race and other insights from bestselling author Beverly Daniel Tatum.
Letters
How reading the To Kill a Mockingbird sequel helped one young teacher confront his own "white savior" mindset.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

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