October 4, 2017

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Vol. 37, Issue 07
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Three long-standing presidential commissions designed to expand educational opportunities for non-white students are set to expire Saturday and members say months of silence from the Trump administration has them worried they’re about to be dissolved.
Whether public-employee unions can continue to demand fees from nonmembers once again hinges on what a deeply divided Supreme Court decides.
It's hard to transfer a teaching license from state to state, but 11 states have made it a little easier.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Obituary
Supporters of independent charter schools want to get back to the charter movement's roots: creating schools that serve as education laboratories.
Educators in Puerto Rico, where the public school system was already in financial distress before Hurricane Maria hit, say the overwhelming need for basic supplies like electricity and water will make students' return to school extremely challenging.
A lower percentage of teachers are "chronically absent" in charter schools than in other public schools, says a new report. It attributes the differences to collective bargaining.
Educators and experts debated strategies to attract the best and brightest into teaching while also creating a more demographically diverse teaching corps at a conference in Washington last month.
Students with dyslexia often struggle with math fluency as well, and scholars at a recent conference put a spotlight on some of the possible connections.
Over the last year and a half, states have stepped up their focus on career and technical education with a spate of new laws and policies.
The schools in a recent study faced numerous hurdles in turning personalized learning principles into classroom realities, but there were signs of progress.
A record number of students from the class of 2017 took the revised SAT. But don’t try comparing this year’s scores to last year’s.
In states including Connecticut and Wisconsin, fiscal bickering among state officials continues, putting local districts on edge.
The U.S. Secretary of Education spoke with Education Week in a wide-ranging interview during the secretary’s recent “Rethink School” tour
The education secretary said higher ed. and K-12 officials need clarity around how to protect due process rights of those who are accused of sexual assault.
In addition to hearing a major case involving public-employee unions, the U.S. Supreme Court may face a wide range of disputes of keen interest to the education community.
The education secretary sought to shine a spotlight on promising educational approaches in a trip that took her to six states.
Nearly all states have now laid out their blueprints for how they intend to hold schools accountable under the Every Student Succeeds Act. Here's our review of state ESSA plans.
Including arts in science and math instruction promotes student creativity and job preparation, writes STEAM specialist Susan Riley.
Turning "STEM" into "STEAM" won't stop arts from getting squeezed out of the curriculum, cautions researcher Jay P. Greene.
Arts instruction and understanding the creative process can help prepare students for 21st-century challenges, write Emily Gasoi and Sonya Robbins Hoffmann.
After 50 years of arts-learning research, here's what Howard Gardner and Ellen Winner have learned—and what they still hope to.
Letters
The research in favor of arts learning is stacking up, writes Johns Hopkins University’s Mariale Hardiman.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

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