September 6, 2017

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 03
toc cover
Past Issues

For past issues, select from the drop-down menu.

School systems that identify, discipline, or segregate students with disabilities at a disproportionate rate gird for a requirement that they set aside some federal aid for early-intervention remedies.
The technology offers a middle ground between college classwork and a real K-12 classroom, experts say.
As some 220 school districts affected by Hurricane Harvey were working to get students back to school, school administrators who have survived other devastating natural disasters know the road to normalcy can take years.
A pair of Massachusetts educators are chipping away at the nearly total absence of context for LGBT individuals in the K-12 curriculum.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
The threat of federal budget cuts has some states wondering how they'll deliver on plans to beef up principal and teacher professional-development efforts.
What can you learn when students give up on the test? A new measure offers clues.
United Nations agencies have facilitated ed-tech programs for students in refugee camps worldwide, but the Syrian conflict has drawn an especially high level of involvement.
Free lunch and transportation back to their home school are among the rights and services afforded students displaced by the devastating storm, all of which could put extra weight on local districts.
California broke ground by requiring schools to teach about the contributions of LGBT people, but it’s been slow-going ever since.
The new program barely received bipartisan approval from lawmakers, while incorporating elements aimed at issues of accountability and transparency.
The new school year brings changes for states that are starting—or, in at least one case, dropping—state-directed efforts to improve some of their lowest-performing schools.
Barron Trump, who finished up the last school year at a private school in New York City, is attending St. Andrew's Episcopal School in suburban Maryland this school year.
Schools must meet these five responsibilities to truly be defined as “public,” writes education professor Sarah M. Stitzlein.
School success is often measured by test scores, but they don’t paint an accurate picture, says Jack Schneider.
Letters
Letters
The threat of litigation could motivate state officials to work with education researchers, write two law professors.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented