August 30, 2017

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Vol. 37, Issue 02
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But the public also wants schools to provide more career and health supports—even if it means less academics, a poll finds.
Despite new ESSA-era responsibilities, many state schools superintendents earn much less than the heads of big local districts in their states, an Education Week salary review finds.
Language in the sweeping federal law—added at the urging of the film, music, and publishing industries—advises schools to get the message out about copyright laws.
Because of a little-noticed provision in ESSA, states that offer several diploma options may have to revise their graduation rates.
New research suggesting that older kindergartners have an edge over their younger classmates complicates an already difficult decision.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Black students and low-income children are more likely to attend public schools that get shut down for poor performance and most of them will not end up attending better schools, according to new research from Stanford University.
Federal rules known as “smart snacks in schools” set stricter standards for foods that schools participating in the National School Lunch Program sell throughout the day.
Some educator attest to the benefits while other experts argue the double duty can't work in many schools.
Teacher ambassador fellows work hard to keep teachers' voices in the federal policy mix—even if the education secretary doesn't always heed their advice.
Most will distribute their share of the $400 million flexible funding grant through a formula rather than a competition, which means many districts will just get a small portion.
A federal judge has ruled that Arizona's ban on ethnic studies courses was motivated by racial discrimination.
State superintendents in recent years have been given increased responsibilities, but in many cases their salaries have not kept pace. That's had implications for recruitment and retention.
The agreements for these high-profile jobs are often chock-full of sweeteners and performance incentives, as well as hard-nosed details about duties.
Eliminating credit recovery as a path to graduation would do more harm than good, writes one assistant superintendent.
Fraudulent graduation practices give a false sense of educational progress, charges former New York City administrator Bernard Gassaway.
The Education Department must step up to enforce ESSA, writes the law’s co-author, former Minnesota Rep. John Kline.
Letters
With more students now able to take the SAT with accommodations, does that change the test's validity? asks school attorney Miriam Kurtzig Freedman.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

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