August 23, 2017

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Vol. 37, Issue 01
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The U.S. secretary of education is finding little traction on school choice, key personnel, or in using her megaphone to broaden the administration's K-12 audience.
Using a tactic known as "dark store theory," some corporate retailers aggressively pursue property tax breaks that can end up costing public schools and local communities hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual revenue.
Officials in the Virginia city wracked by violence centered on a Confederate monument prepare for the safe return of children next week and ways to help them deal with tensions and questions stemming from the unrest.
Research shows children and teachers reap tangible benefits down the road when schools ease the way into this crucial early grade.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Louisiana's two-year-old law, the nation's strictest, may be complicating the work of the researchers who use student data to study schools.
High schools across the country hand out nearly 100 different kinds of diplomas, and most don't offer solid preparation for college or career. The students who bear the brunt of that inequity are most likely to be English learners, students with disabilities, low-income students, or those learning English.
Support for charter schools has dropped significantly over the last year, while opposition to private-school choice programs has softened, according to a new public opinion poll from Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.
After scores plummeted this spring on the most-used English-proficiency test, some states are easing up on the criteria for students to exit English-learner support services. Is that the right thing to do?
Across the country, school districts are trying new tactics to avoid starting this school year with an empty teacher's desk, including hiring parents and calling veteran teachers out of retirement.
While a vast majority of the nation’s public school teachers are white women, the latest data from the federal staffing survey shows increasing diversity, and big differences between the teaching force at traditional and charter schools.
New technologies and a shifting legal landscape challenge school administrators grappling with student sexting incidents.
Colorado is the latest state to create an endorsement in science, technology, engineering, and math for students who succeed in rigorous courses in those fields. Will the new credential carry weight with colleges and employers?
Returning to the office after maternity leave is never easy for working mothers, but it might be even harder for classroom teachers who want to continue to breast-feed their babies.
After a rocky start from federal officials, approvals and feedback are coming at a fast clip for states looking to get their Every Student Succeeds Act plans in order.
There are mixed reactions to a report that the Justice Department is recruiting lawyers to investigate and potentially sue colleges and universities over racial preferences.
A draft proposal targets requirements in the federal K-12 law dealing with disadvantaged and historically underperforming students and already has drawn fierce pushback from civil rights advocates.
U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos recently invested as much as $5.5 million in Neurocore, a company that experts say makes questionable claims based on weak scientific evidence.
Is the United States on the right track when it comes to funding education? Five education experts and practitioners discuss.
The American education system is rooted in racial inequity. Critical-thinking teachers can help, writes one assistant principal.
Letters
The recent events in Charlottesville, Va., demand that Americans rethink how we teach the Civil War, writes historian Melvin Patrick Ely.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

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