May 10, 2017

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Vol. 36, Issue 30
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States are preparing to fill the void if Obama-era ed-tech initiatives lose support due to the new administration's educational and budget priorities.
In Oakland, Calif., some teachers are working to deepen their knowledge on how to integrate social-emotional learning into their teaching of traditional subjects such as reading, writing, and math.
Spurred on by new flexibility under the Every Student Succeeds Act and by revenue shortfalls, state legislators scrap over who should be in charge of education policy and how to better spend K-12 dollars, among other issues.
Tennessee wants to ensure that its career-technical education programs propel students toward college and good-paying jobs.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
The USDA relaxed nutrition standards for school lunches, but the changes fall short of the aggressive scale-back that some conservative members of congress have pushed for in recent years.
A report finds that a record 83.2 percent of students are finishing high school on time and that the gains may be real.
A federal judge will allow Gardendale, Ala., to form its own school district of mostly white students in spite of her criticism that city leaders are doing so as a way to control racial demographics in public schools.
Studies suggest the programs, though few in number, can help retain novice teachers and bring more teachers of color into classrooms.
Efforts to focus parents' attention on their children's early math skills have not gained traction—even as emerging evidence suggests it may be one of the most critical elements of school-readiness.
The hope is that the smaller schools will be less intimidating and more nurturing than big state universities.
The agreement boosts federal aid for Title I and special education through September, but K-12 cuts could loom for fiscal 2018 to pave the way for defense increases.
A task force will take nearly a year to examine regulations put out by previous administrations, determine which step on local control, and issue recommendations.
Local officials welcome the new money and flexibility the formula has shifted to districts since 2013, but a new study finds it's still a work in progress.
Education Week took a look at what Trump has done since taking the oath of office and compared it with what his two immediate predecessors, Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, did during their first 100 days.
To close the achievement gap for low-income black students, we need a more diverse teaching force, writes Rafiq R. Kalam Id-Din II.
Districtwide school discipline reforms can disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline. Superintendents Robert Runcie and Antwan Wilson would know.
Letters
Abstinence-only "garbage" fails to prepare kids for positive sexual encounters and relationships, says Peggy Orenstein in a Commentary Q&A.
Letters
Despite rancorous partisanship, early-childhood education and other pre-K-12 priorities could bridge the political divide, writes David Jacobson.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

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