March 8, 2017

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Vol. 36, Issue 24
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Critics, including some local superintendents, call a method adopted by at least 18 states simplistic, while backers see it as transparent and easy for the public to grasp.
President Donald Trump's plan to boost defense spending by $54 billion and make corresponding domestic cuts may put a new squeeze on U.S. Department of Education funding.
The Ohio education department determined that nine full-time online charter schools overstated their enrollment. The schools say the state's methods are "blatantly unfair."
In a National Academies report on the state of education for ELLs, one theme is consistent: public schools need more resources and research.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Researchers estimate that about 0.7 percent of U.S. teens identify as transgender, but they acknowledge that far better data are needed.
A handful of education schools are using the technology to provide feedback to teaching candidates in residence at schools throughout the country.
As battles move into court or the public sphere, it's very hard for schools chiefs and their boards to find a way to work together effectively.
Teachers in 2010 reported stronger academic skills among children entering school that year than did teachers in 1998, researchers at the University of Virginia and Stanford University found.
Headed up by former Los Angeles superintendent John E. Deasy, The Line will feature a variety of viewpoints on major K-12 issues.
In his first address to a joint session of Congress, President Donald Trump makes clear that he remains serious in concept about his pledge to expand school choice.
DeVos slammed for remarks on HBCU's, a new Senate measure could overturn Obama-era ESSA rules on accountability, and more.
Some states appear more prepared to implement ESSA than others, writes researchers Priscilla Wohlstetter, Darius R. Brown, and Megan Duff.
Low voter turnout underscores why schools must do more to prepare students to be engaged citizens, argues Sidney Trubowitz.
Educators must build bridges between subjects rather than jealously guard their area of expertise, writes educator Alden S. Blodget.
Letters
When it comes to teacher certification, the label "highly qualified" doesn’t mean much, argues University of Oklahoma’s Lawrence Baines.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

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