March 1, 2017

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Vol. 36, Issue 23
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More than 100 Teach For America teachers are among 750,000 undocumented immigrants protected by the deferred-action policy, which President Trump has said is a "very difficult subject" for him.
Scrapping or significantly revamping the Affordable Care Act—a Republican priority—could affect everything from student mental-health services to the hiring of substitute teachers.
A growing number of educators are lobbying against bills to allow guns in schools as some lawmakers argue for arming school personnel to protect students.
As they wrestle with how best to engage students in learning about a sharply divided U.S. government, teachers are finding middle ground in a digital game.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
The College Board reports that more students—and more low-income students—are taking Advanced Placement tests. But will that growth continue?
Some K-12 leaders are wary about the new education secretary and her views on the nation's public schools.
As the Trump administration ramps up deportations, some K-12 leaders are pledging to protect the rights and privacy of undocumented students. How much can they do?
All eyes will be on the Supreme Court later this month when it hears a case that could either expand or curtail the rights of transgender students.
Federal lawmakers are again taking a close look at the Higher Education Act, with broad implications for K-12 issues such as college access for low-income students.
Making federal aid for students with disabilities available has been on the drawing board in conservative circles for years, and the new education secretary has voiced some support for the concept.
The justices gave a unanimous, but for now partial, victory to a family that sued a Michigan district that barred a service dog for a child with cerebral palsy.
U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos kicked off her first public speech, accountability regulations for the Every Student Succeeds Act have been put on pause by the Trump administration, and more.
Education aid can account for up to half of a state's budget, and it's a subject of heated debate, especially in places dealing with budget shortfalls and court orders.
Here are summaries of recent annual addresses by governors around the country.
Even if Donald Trump could "end" the common core, that may not be what teachers want, writes Maria Ferguson.
Teachers' unions and charter school advocates must join in solidarity for greater education equity, writes Jia Lok Pratt.
In order to resolve the rancorous debate, charters must reconnect with their original purpose, writes Ron Wolk.
Letters
Here is what’s ahead for school choice, ed tech, and more, according to the CEO of a personalized-learning company.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 1/1/2017)

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