January 18, 2017

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Vol. 36, Issue 18
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Some already are proposing tight timelines to meet their state-determined goals under the Every Student Succeeds Act, while others worry about boxing themselves in.
Thanks to a little-noticed ESSA provision, many schools are losing subsidies that once defrayed the testing costs for needy students.
Policy implications loom as the agency prepares to replace current political appointees with the incoming administration's picks, even though they make up only a fraction of the department's workforce.
After fending off threats from Congressional Republicans for years, some big federal studies that yield troves of data on education face an even more uncertain future.
More than 90 percent of the students who attend the schools bearing the names of either President Obama or first lady Michelle Obama are black or Hispanic, a stark contrast to the racial breakdown of public schools as a whole.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
As the economy improves, administrators are turning to billboards, Twitter, and college job fairs to keep classrooms staffed.
Nature-based pre-primary programs are growing like weeds in forests and meadows around the country.
Education officials are wrestling with how they would protect student data if the Trump administration tried to use it for immigration-enforcement purposes.
A handful of words and phrases could end up setting the standard for the level of benefits school districts nationwide must provide to students with disabilities.
An attack on a Chicago 18-year-old is a reminder that children and youth with disabilities are uniquely vulnerable, something federal education officials have aimed to address.
Here are summaries of recent annual addresses by governors around the country.
The political alliance between charter school and voucher supporters may be fraying, writes Jeffery R. Henig.
In rural communities, education is an engine of exodus rather than economic development, write Catharine Biddle and Daniella Hall.
Letters
Five education policy experts weigh in on what the K-12 policy priorities should be under a Trump administration.
In his final Commentary as education secretary, John B. King Jr. considers the state of American schooling.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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