January 11, 2017

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Vol. 36, Issue 17
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While teachers' familiarity with the common core is growing, just 1 in 5 feel certain that their training and resources are high quality, finds the Education Week Research Center’s latest survey.
In a case involving a Colorado student with autism, the Supreme Court will consider what level of benefits school districts must provide to students with disabilities.
The president entered office in 2009 with education a top priority, scoring game-changing policy wins in some areas before hitting stiff headwinds in his second term.
Schools are being hit with a form of malware that locks away computer files unless they can be restored from backups or a ransom is paid.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
As it revises its certification process, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards says it's seeing an uptick in applicants.
The latest PISA results showed that high-scoring 15-year-olds were more likely than low scorers to have had at least a year of preschool.
School finance formulas and implementation of the new federal education law are among the issues on the agenda as 50 state legislatures get to work for their 2017 sessions.
Even without the $20 billion voucher program President-elect Donald Trump has championed, the new administration could use a variety of programs to boost school choice.
Gov. Dannel Malloy will seek to dramatically adjust the way Connecticut distributes more than $4 billion of state aid, he told legislators in his annual address, as the legislature gets back to business for the 2017 session.
At high-profile moments, President Barack Obama used the stature of the office to champion young people's education and well-being, sometimes in starkly personal terms.
From his Race to the Top program to civil rights enforcement and his focus on early education and immigrant students, President Barack Obama made education a signature issue.
With the release of the 2017 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings and on the eve of the Donald Trump presidency, Frederick M. Hess and others weigh in on "the leftward tilt" of education scholarship.
Education researchers must champion why their research matters and engage unlikely allies outside of the academy, writes David R. Garcia.
Policymakers are less likely to support a university that appears hostile to roughly half of the electorate, argues Joshua Dunn.
Letters
Researchers must commit to ensuring that their classrooms are welcoming to students of all political stripes, writes Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj.
On the cusp of Donald Trump's inauguration, Frederick M. Hess warns that policymakers could sideline education scholarship because of its left-leaning bias.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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