A Seat at the Table With Education Week: Segregated School Funding and the Seemingly Unattainable American Dream

Segregated School Funding and the Seemingly Unattainable American Dream

A Conversation With Andre Perry

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Brookings Institute Fellow Andre Perry says that “school districts are an heirloom of our segregated past.” Perry will join as a guest to discuss why schools predominated by students of color receive $23 billion less a year in funding than those with a majority-white population. We’ll also examine how to bring more funding to schools in Black and brown communities and whether the social services so many schools must offer are widening the learning gap. School and district leaders who are facing particularly challenging budgets won’t want to miss this episode.


Date

Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020
2 to 3 p.m. ET

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Moderator

Peter DeWitt
Author, Finding Common Ground Opinion Blogger
@PeterMDeWitt

DeWitt was a K-5 teacher for 11 years and a principal for eight. He is an independent researcher who runs competency-based workshops nationally and internationally with a focus on school leadership, collaborative cultures, instructional leadership, and inclusive school climates. His work has been adopted at the state and university levels, and he works with school districts, school boards, regional networks, and ministries of education across North America, Australia, Scandinavia, and the United Kingdom. He is also Visible Learning Trainer who works with John Hattie.

In 2020, DeWitt created the Educational Leadership Collective—a team of women and men from the United States and Canada who focus on all aspects of school leadership, including instructional leadership, instructional coaching, equity, and marginalized populations, as well as how to build collective efficacy.

DeWitt is the author of seven books, including Instructional Leadership: Creating Practice Out of Theory (Corwin, 2020).


Guest Speaker

Andre M. Perry
Fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings, Author of Know Your Price
@andreperryedu

Perry is a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings, a scholar-in-residence at American University, and a columnist for the Hechinger Report. He is the author of the new book Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities, which is currently available wherever books are sold. A nationally known and respected commentator on race, structural inequality, and education, Perry is a regular contributor to MSNBC and has been published by The New York Times, The Nation, The Washington Post, TheRoot.com and CNN.com. Perry has also made appearances on CNN, PBS, National Public Radio, NBC, and ABC. His research focuses on race and structural inequality, education, and economic inclusion. Perry’s recent scholarship at Brookings has analyzed Black-majority cities and institutions in America, focusing on valuable assets worthy of increased investment.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, Perry has documented the underlying causes for the outsized number of coronavirus-related deaths in Black communities. His Brookings research has illuminated how certain forms of social distancing historically accelerated economic and social disparities between Black people and the rest of the country. Perry also mapped racial inequities in housing, income, and health to underscore how policy discrimination makes Black Americans more vulnerable to COVID-19.

His research has spotlighted the struggles of Black businesses—including artists and art institutions, restaurants, and barbershops and beauty salons—as they await federal relief from COVID-19’s economic impact. In education, he explained how college campus closings put housing-insecure students at risk during the pandemic. He's also written on the unrealized value of teachers’ work that’s been made apparent by COVID-19, and has commented on the potential loss of Black teachers as a result of an impending recession.


Resources



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