Special Report: Teaching Vulnerable Students

The American education system has a long list of programs intended to serve students who need something more from teachers than standard instruction. There is special education for students with disabilities, for example, and English-language assistance for students who are new to the United States.

But what about the homeless child who also needs special education services? The student caught in the juvenile justice system? The immigrant child living in fear of deportation?

This report focuses on these and other fragile student populations, their needs, and the challenges educators face in engaging them in learning.


Special Report: Teaching Vulnerable and At-Risk Students

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Many of the most vulnerable populations of students in the nation’s schools are also hidden populations—sometimes intentionally so—but they still need special attention from educators.
March 7, 2018 – Education Week

A Wyoming correctional school is part of a network working to improve the quality of instruction provided to the "invisible" students living in juvenile-justice facilities.
March 7, 2018 – Education Week

How many hours of instruction do incarcerated students get in juvenile justice facilities in your state?
March 7, 2018 – Education Week

Schools inside juvenile justice facilities struggle mightily to find and hold onto teachers who have the skills to deliver meaningful education to some of society's most at-risk students.
March 7, 2018 – Education Week

Teachers say it's a struggle to keep some immigrant students engaged in school while their standing under the Trump administration is so precarious.
March 7, 2018 – Education Week

Nearly 1.4 million children in public school experience homelessness. Eighteen percent of them have a disability, too.
March 7, 2018 – Education Week

George Garcia, a former foster-care child now mentoring foster students in college, found his way into academically challenging classes through friends. Many bright foster-care students aren't so lucky.
March 7, 2018 – Education Week

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