What the Research Says

Praise Seen as Effective Classroom-Management Tool

"Effects of Teachers' Praise-to-Reprimand Ratios on Elementary Students' On-Task Behaviour"

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

When teachers use more praise and fewer reprimands in the classroom, it seems to help students stay on-task and behave better, according to a new study.

"The higher the teachers' [praise to reprimand ratio], the higher the students' on-task behavior percentage," Paul Caldarella, a professor of counseling psychology and special education at Brigham Young University, wrote in a report published last week in the journal Educational Psychology.

In a randomized experiment, Caldarella and his team spent three years observing teachers and students in 151 K-6 classrooms in Missouri, Tennessee, and Utah. Half the teachers were asked to do what they normally do; the other half used a classroom management system that reinforces social skills with praise, as their main management tool.

Vol. 39, Issue 21, Page 6

Published in Print: February 12, 2020, as Praise Seen as Effective Classroom-Management Tool
Notice: We recently upgraded our comments. (Learn more here.) If you are logged in as a subscriber or registered user and already have a Display Name on edweek.org, you can post comments. If you do not already have a Display Name, please create one here.
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented