Report Roundup

Test-Taking

"Taking PISA Seriously: How Accurate Are Low-Stakes Exams?"

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

Worldwide, a high percentage of students either skip questions, spend insufficient time answering them, or quit early when taking the Program for International Student Assessment test. As a result, a handful of countries fall lower in overall PISA rankings than they might if their students applied themselves, according to a new study.

The authors mined keystroke data—how long students spent on each test question and how they responded to various kinds of test questions—from the 2015 online administration of PISA, which was taken by students in more than 58 countries, including the United States. They found, for instance, that wealthier students and lower-skilled students tended to take the exam less seriously. And countries in which students reported sitting for more "high stakes" exams had a higher proportion of students blowing off PISA, which does not carry stakes for students.

In all, the proportion of students exhibiting "nonserious" behavior on the test ranged from a low of 14 percent in Korea to a high of 67 percent in Brazil. In the United States, about 23 percent of test-takers fell into that category.

Vol. 38, Issue 03, Page 5

Published in Print: September 5, 2018, as Test-Taking
Related Stories
Notice: We recently upgraded our comments. (Learn more here.) If you are logged in as a subscriber or registered user and already have a Display Name on edweek.org, you can post comments. If you do not already have a Display Name, please create one here.
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented