No More SAT for Teachers Who Want Certification in Michigan

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Lansing, Mich.

A new Michigan law eliminates a requirement that teachers take the SAT, the standardized test commonly used in college admissions.

The test was required for people who wanted to become certified to teach in Michigan. But critics say it's not a good indicator of a successful teacher.

Sen. Marty Knollenberg, a Republican from Troy, says the SAT doesn't measure enthusiasm, passion or competency in a certain subject. He says it can be another hurdle to getting people into the teaching profession. The new law kicks in on Sept. 25.

The Detroit Free Press says aspiring teachers still must pass a test in their subject.

Kate Walsh of the National Council on Teacher Quality doesn't have a problem with eliminating the SAT but believes teachers should take a basic skills test.

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