After Parkland Tragedy, Law Enforcement Groups Team Up to Boost School Safety

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

A coalition of national law enforcement groups is working together to come up with a list of best practices to improve school safety in the aftermath of the Parkland mass shooting.

“Nothing is more important than the safety of our schools … and making sure that our children come home safely every day,” said Louis Dekmar, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

The initiative was inspired by Parkland dad Max Schachter, who has been imploring politicians, law enforcement, and education officials to do whatever they can to prevent future violent attacks at any school in the nation.

Schachter, whose son Alex was murdered in the Feb. 14 mass shooting, said he was shocked when he found out there is no nationally recognized list of recommendations to boost school security.

At a news conference Wednesday in Washington, D.C., organized by Schachter’s advocacy group, Safe Schools for Alex Foundation, veteran police officers said the effort is overdue.

The crime experts said they will review what has worked—and what has not worked—and compile a recommended list that all schools and law enforcement can use to protect students, teachers, and staff.

Related Blog

They will look at many issues, including how campuses are designed, the best kinds of security devices and practices, and the use of newly available technology.

The eight law enforcement groups that have joined the coalition are the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the National Association of School Resource Officers, the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, the Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies, the National Sheriffs’ Association, the National Tactical Officers Association, the Major Cities Chiefs Association, and the Indiana Sheriffs’ Association.

Web Only

Notice: We recently upgraded our comments. (Learn more here.) If you are logged in as a subscriber or registered user and already have a Display Name on edweek.org, you can post comments. If you do not already have a Display Name, please create one here.
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented