Opinion
Education Commentary

New in Print

By Anne E. Das — January 09, 2007 3 min read

Developmental Disorders and Health

Iversen, who with her husband started the Cure Autism Now Foundation after their son Dov was diagnosed with the developmental disorder, recounts how meeting Soma Mukhopadhyay and her teenage son Tito—whom Iversen calls the “Rosetta Stone for autism”—revolutionized her ability to communicate with her child. Tito, who has been profiled in publications such as National Geographic, Scientific American, and The New York Times, was first brought with his mother from India to the United States by CAN in 2000. Severely autistic and nonverbal, Tito nonetheless has been taught by his mother to communicate through writing, and has even published books of poetry and philosophical prose on his condition. In this book, Iversen describes Soma Mukhopadhyay’s teaching method, its effect on her own son, and the scientific community’s reaction to it. In so doing, she details not only a possible medical breakthrough, but also the struggles common to families around the world affected by autism.

A journalist and mother writes on the difficulties and joys of raising two autistic sons.

An examination of the disorder’s manifestation in children and adolescents, from a teacher turned child psychiatrist.

Arguments for and against childhood vaccination are detailed in this history of the field of immunizations.

Urban Education

See Also

Read the accompanying excerpt,

Play Imperiled

An education journalist who is a former assistant director of Harvard University’s Project on School Desegregation, Eaton explores what she sees as the worsening of racial isolation in America’s inner-city schools. She concentrates on Hartford, Conn., where she follows a class of 4th graders and their teacher in an all-minority public school, Simpson-Waverly Elementary. Recognized in 2003 by the Bush administration as a model of urban education, it serves as her testing ground for whether separation can ever mean equality. Hartford is also home to the other focus of her inquiry, the landmark school desegregation lawsuit Sheff v. O’Neill, now, through appeals, stretching into its 18th year. Overall, the picture Eaton creates is one of educational inequity, as the case’s victories remain unrealized by the state and the school’s successes prove to be short-lived. Author Jonathan Kozol has said of The Children in Room E4, “A very important book, it ought to be read widely.”

A collection of studies and reflections on education programs targeting low-performing, underserved students in high-poverty schools.

Also of Note

When the United Nations declared 1979 “The Year of the Child,” the organization also named it “The Year of Janusz Korczak” to celebrate both his teachings and the centenary of his birth. A Polish pediatrician, child advocate, educator, orphanage director, and author, he wrote a children’s book, King Matt the First, that is as beloved in Poland as Peter Pan is in England. Korczak unfortunately is also known for his death during the Holocaust: Having rejected several offers to save his life, he joined 200 Jewish orphans whom he refused to abandon as they were rounded up in the Warsaw ghetto for deportation to the Treblinka extermination camp. Few of Korczak’s written works have been translated into English; this collection of approximately 100 quotations marks the first time many of them have been made available in the United States. Though compiled with parents in mind, most of these passages are equally relevant for educators. A brief biography of Korczak is also included.

A compilation of classic British writings, songs, and speeches, culled by the education historian and her son for this sequel to their best-selling The American Reader.

A much-lauded teacher offers practical suggestions for bringing energy into the classroom.

A graduate-level textbook geared toward future teachers, school counselors, and administrators.

A book for experienced educators and other adults who regularly work with teenagers that aims to translate developmental research and theory into practice.

Several prominent Hoover Institution scholars weigh in on judicial actions in this collection of essays.

A debate between Gardner and his scholarly opposition, through analyses of his work and his responses to them.

Two volumes outlining the major policies, perspectives, historical figures and events, and organizations that have influenced the education of the largest minority group in American public schools.

Suggestions on how relations between foundations and educational institutions might be strengthened, published to coincide with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s centennial.

Insider tips from published educators on every stage of the process, from drafting to book tours.

A version of this article appeared in the January 10, 2007 edition of Education Week as New in Print