Opinion
Education Opinion

2005: In the Wake of Hurricane Katrina

August 19, 2015 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The devastation from Hurricane Katrina to the city of New Orleans in August of 2005 stirred educators and researchers from across the country to consider the implications for the region’s schools. Education Week published a number of Commentaries that reflected a range of national and local concerns that continue to resonate 10 years later. Excerpts from these essays illustrate the authors’ perspectives.

BRIC ARCHIVE

“We have been pretending since 1965 that the little bit of federal aid provided for disadvantaged children can overcome the historic legacies of racial discrimination and poverty. We can’t pretend any more—the hurricanes washed that pretense away.”
—Rachel B. Tompkins, Nov. 16, 2005, “Disaster Equity: Keeping Rural Schools and Communities in the Picture as Rebuilding Begins

BRIC ARCHIVE

“The government cannot appear to be compassionate, and yet adhere to a rigid policy of standardizing education. Compassion is personal. Standardization is not.”
—Elaine M. Garan, Nov. 9, 2005, “Will Katrina Topple the No Child Left Behind Law?

“Intensive academic learning will need to take a back seat to recovery for some students for some time.”
—William Pfohl & Howard Adelman, Oct. 5, 2005, “Weathering the Storm: After the Gulf Coast Hurricanes, Children’s Mental Health Must Be a Top Priority

BRIC ARCHIVE

“American school planners will be as close as they have ever come to a ‘green field’ opportunity: A large public education system will need to be built from scratch.”
—Paul T. Hill, Sept. 20, 2005, “Re-Creating Public Education in New Orleans

"[W]hat separates this state from others that face similar challenges is its guts and its understanding that small changes just aren’t enough.”
—Kati Haycock, Sept. 14, 2005, “Don’t Count Them Out: Louisiana’s Schools Will Come Back—Again

Related Tags:

Events

Special Education Webinar Reading, Dyslexia, and Equity: Best Practices for Addressing a Threefold Challenge
Learn about proven strategies for instruction and intervention that support students with dyslexia.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Personalized Learning Webinar
No Time to Waste: Individualized Instruction Will Drive Change
Targeted support and intervention can boost student achievement. Join us to explore tutoring’s role in accelerating the turnaround. 
Content provided by Varsity Tutors for Schools
Student Well-Being K-12 Essentials Forum Social-Emotional Learning: Making It Meaningful
Join us for this event with educators and experts on the damage the pandemic did to academic and social and emotional well-being.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: November 23, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: November 2, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: October 19, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: October 12, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read