Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Education

News in Brief: A Washington Roundup

September 27, 2000 2 min read

Federal Spending Nearly Doubles in 10 Years

The federal government spent roughly $123 billion on education in the fiscal year that ends this week, nearly twice as much as it did 10 years ago, according to a report by the National Center for Education Statistics.

The federal government spent roughly $123 billion on education in the fiscal year that ends this week, nearly twice as much as it did 10 years ago, according to a report by the National Center for Education Statistics.

That figure represents money from dozens of federal agencies, including the departments of Education, Health and Human Services, Agriculture, and Defense. When adjusted for inflation, spending over the past decade increased by about 55 percent.

The report, issued this month, estimates that the federal share of funding for the nation’s elementary and secondary schools declined from 12 percent in fiscal 1980 to 7 percent in fiscal 1990, but has since risen to 9 percent.

It says the Education Department provides far more money for education than any other single agency. Its budget outlays—the actual amount of dollars spent—totaled $40.7 billion in fiscal 2000, which ends Sept. 30.

Copies of “Federal Support for Education: Fiscal Years 1980 to 2000" are available online.(Requires Adobe’s Acrobat Reader.)

—Erik W. Robelen


Report Shows Support for School-to-Work Programs

Federally financed school-to-work programs, which promote stronger links between employers and students through internships and other work-related activities, received high marks from the participants, according to a report released last week.

The Public Forum Institute, a nonpartisan, Washington- based group that explores public-policy issues, released “Perspectives on Progress: The School-To-Work National Customer Dialogues.” Institute officials surveyed more than 700 educators, parents, and employees in 33 states. The report was requested by the Department of Education’s National School-to-Work Office.

Nearly 100 percent of those surveyed said school-to-work programs had increased students interest in careers and better prepared them for college. But a majority of participants said more time and resources were needed to fully develop and sustain their partnerships. Federal funding for the school-to-work program is scheduled to run out on Oct. 1, 2001. States are then expected to assume full responsibility for their school-to-work programs.

The report, “Perspectives on Progress: The School-to-Work National Customer Dialogues,” is available online from the Public Forum Institute.

—John Gehring

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

BASE Program Site Director
Thornton, CO, US
Adams 12 Five Star Schools
Director of Information Technology
Montpelier, Vermont
Washington Central UUSD
Great Oaks AmeriCorps Fellow August 2021 - June 2022
New York City, New York (US)
Great Oaks Charter Schools
Director of Athletics
Farmington, Connecticut
Farmington Public Schools

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read