Education

Catholic-School Scores Higher

By Blake Rodman — January 29, 1986 1 min read

Students attending Roman Catholic schools score above the national average on standardized reading-proficiency tests, according to a study by the National Catholic Educational Association.

Using 1983-84 test scores provided by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, Valerie Lee, the study’s author, compared the reading achievement of Catholic-school students to national averages and found that for every subgroup she examined-including classifications by sex, race, ethnicity, and geographic region-Catholic-school students scored higher.

Above-Average Scores

Ms. Lee found, for instance, that black and Hispanic students attending Catholic schools score “well above” the national average for their subgroups and that the gap between the scores of black and Hispanic students and those of whites is narrower in Catholic schools than nationally.

In her report, Ms. Lee says that it is impossible to tell for sure why Catholic students score higher on the tests.

She notes, however, earlier findings by NAEP that Catholic-school students tend to do more homework, watch less television, receive more instruction in academic subject areas, and take more academic courses in high school than their public-school counterparts.

These factors, she writes, “cannot be discounted from an explanation for the substantial reading-proficiency advantages [Catholic-school] students show in almost every area.”

“It had been hypothesized that the superior performance of Catholic to public high-school students ... might be due, at least in part, to the fact that Catholic secondary schools enroll a student body that is somewhat more selective than that of Catholic elementary schools,” Ms. Lee added in her report. “However, the new reading proficiency data from the NAEP do not confirm that hypothesis.”

Copies of the 36-page report, “1983-84 NAEP Reading Proficiency: Catholic School Results and National Averages,” are available for $6.60 ($5 for N.C.E.A. members) from the N.C.E.A. Publication Sales Office, 1077 30th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20007.

A version of this article appeared in the January 29, 1986 edition of Education Week

Let us know what you think!

We’re looking for feedback on our new site to make sure we continue to provide you the best experience.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Future of Work Webinar
Digital Literacy Strategies to Promote Equity
Our new world has only increased our students’ dependence on technology. This makes digital literacy no longer a “nice to have” but a “need to have.” How do we ensure that every student can navigate
Content provided by Learning.com
Mathematics Online Summit Teaching Math in a Pandemic
Attend this online summit to ask questions about how COVID-19 has affected achievement, instruction, assessment, and engagement in math.
School & District Management Webinar Examining the Evidence: Catching Kids Up at a Distance
As districts, schools, and families navigate a new normal following the abrupt end of in-person schooling this spring, students’ learning opportunities vary enormously across the nation. Access to devices and broadband internet and a secure

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Project Manager
United States
K12 Inc.
High School Permanent Substitute Teacher
Woolwich Township, NJ, US
Kingsway Regional School District
MS STEM Teacher
Woolwich Township, NJ, US
Kingsway Regional School District
Speech Therapist - Long Term Sub
Woolwich Township, NJ, US
Kingsway Regional School District

Read Next

Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of stories from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read