Chat

Harnessing the Potential of Instructional Coaching

Thursday, June 6, 2013, 7 to 8 p.m. ET
Click here for more information about this chat.

Note: No special equipment other than Internet access is needed to participate in any of our text-based chats. Participants may begin submitting questions the morning of the chat.

 Harnessing the Potential of Instructional Coaching(06/06/2013) 
8:41
Bryan Toporek: 
Good morning, and welcome to today's free Education Week Teacher chat, Harnessing the Potential of Instructional Coaching. I've just opened the chat for questions, so please start submitting yours below.

We'll be back at 7 p.m. ET with our guest for the day, Elena Aguilar. Hope to see you then!
Thursday June 6, 2013 8:41 Bryan Toporek
6:57
Bryan Toporek: 
Folks, thanks again for joining us for today's free Education Week Teacher chat, Harnessing the Potential of Instructional Coaching, with guest Elena Aguilar. We'll be getting underway in about 5 minutes.

In the meantime, please keep submitting your questions below. Thanks in advance!
Thursday June 6, 2013 6:57 Bryan Toporek
7:01
Bryan Toporek: 
Alright, folks, I'm turning control of the chat over to today's moderator, Anthony Rebora, the managing editor of Education Week Teacher. Take it away, Anthony!
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:01 Bryan Toporek
7:01
Anthony Rebora: 
Hello all. Welcome to our much-anticipated chat on instructional coaching. Joining me is Elena Aguilar, one of Education Week Teacher's regular bloggers and the author of the new book "The Art of Coaching: Effective Strategies for School Transformation" - a really nuanced look at what goes into effective teaching coaching. Thanks for attending - looks like we've got a very engaged and informed audience on hand.

Elena, before we start taking questions, can you tell us just a little bit about your background and your coaching philosophy.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:01 Anthony Rebora
7:01
Elena Aguilar: 
Sure, Anthony. And thank you for having me.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:01 Elena Aguilar
7:02
Anthony Rebora: 
Our pleasure
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:02 Anthony Rebora
7:02
Elena Aguilar: 
I began teaching in the Oakland public schools almost 20 years ago. I taught elementary and then middle school and then became an instructional coach...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:02 Elena Aguilar
7:03
Elena Aguilar: 
I was inspired to become a coach because I saw such high turnover of teachers in our urban schools. I recognized that teachers needed all kinds of support -- instructive as well as emotional...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:03 Elena Aguilar
7:03
Elena Aguilar: 
My coaching philosophy is built around this experience. I propose a "transformational" coaching model which seeks to explore and shift someone's behaviors, beliefs, and being.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:03 Elena Aguilar
7:04
Anthony Rebora: 
Excellent. And I know there is a great deal about your philosophy and how it has developed in your book
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:04 Anthony Rebora
7:04
Elena Aguilar: 
Yes, I attempt to make explicit the "why" of what I suggest.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:04 Elena Aguilar
7:05
[Comment From Wendy OWendy O: ] 
When you think about your typical day as a coach, what kinds of tasks would you be doing?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:05 Wendy O
7:05
Anthony Rebora: 
Wendy's question seems like a good place to start.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:05 Anthony Rebora
7:06
Elena Aguilar: 
This is a great question, Wendy! In my book, I created a "typical schedule" for an instructional coach...It's on page 233 for those who have the book...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:06 Elena Aguilar
7:06
Elena Aguilar: 
A typical day consists of meeting with a coachee for conversation...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:06 Elena Aguilar
7:06
Elena Aguilar: 
Observing a coachee and sharing the data that was gathered...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:06 Elena Aguilar
7:07
Elena Aguilar: 
Some reflective time--perhaps writing time--for the coach. We need to process what we experience and do, and reflect on how our work is leading to changes in teacher practice...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:07 Elena Aguilar
7:07
Elena Aguilar: 
Coaches can also play key roles in facilitating teams, so a typical day might also include facilitating a team (say a 7th grade team of teachers, or an ELA department) in an inquiry cycle around their practice...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:07 Elena Aguilar
7:08
Elena Aguilar: 
Finally, I think coaches get a great deal out of spending part of their day expanding their knowledge and skill sets -- reading professional literature, collaborating with colleagues, analyzing data, etc. Great question!
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:08 Elena Aguilar
7:08
Anthony Rebora: 
Here's a good follow up from Beth W.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:08 Anthony Rebora
7:08
[Comment From Beth W.Beth W.: ] 
Approximately how many "coach-ees" are you responsible for in a given year?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:08 Beth W.
7:08
Elena Aguilar: 
Oh, that's another great question from Beth. But it's a question that raises a number of other questions...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:08 Elena Aguilar
7:09
Elena Aguilar: 
I don't really believe it's strategic to start with the number of coachees, but rather, we need to start with broader goals around instructional practice change and PD. Coaching is a form of professional development, it's a way for teachers and others to reflect on and revise their practices. So we need to start there...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:09 Elena Aguilar
7:10
Elena Aguilar: 
However, I can tell you how many coachees I think is more or less ideal...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:10 Elena Aguilar
7:10
Elena Aguilar: 
I often reference a piece of research by Linda Darling-Hammond which says that teachers need 50 hours of high quality PD in order to change a particular practice...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:10 Elena Aguilar
7:11
Elena Aguilar: 
That's a lot of hours! I think that in order to provide the kind of depth that a teacher needs, I'd recommend somewhere between 5-10 teachers, depending on the additional responsibilities that the coach has--how many teams does she facilitate, what other duties, etc.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:11 Elena Aguilar
7:11
[Comment From JamesJames: ] 
Every teacher and every school is different in their life style, philosophy of teaching, and approach to teaching, how is your transformational model flexible enough to adjust to these differences?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:11 James
7:12
Elena Aguilar: 
The model I propose doesn't really assume an agenda that wouldn't be flexible. There aren't too many "must dos." What's essential in my model is that we listen deeply, listen and listen and listen...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:12 Elena Aguilar
7:13
Elena Aguilar: 
And then that we respond by exploring the actions that people are taking (their behaviors) as well as the beliefs below those actions. That's a big question, James.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:13 Elena Aguilar
7:13
[Comment From KatieKatie: ] 
How do you schedule one-on-one time with very busy teachers, especially those with family obligations that make them leave right after school and tons of extra responsibilities that take up their conference periods?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:13 Katie
7:14
Elena Aguilar: 
Katie, another great question! This implies an inquiry into the systems at the school -- and it necessitates an inquiry into the conditions that allow for effective coaching...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:14 Elena Aguilar
7:15
Elena Aguilar: 
An effective coaching programs prioritizes resources (like time) in order for a teacher to meet with a coach. It's a conversation to have with an administrator about creating the time for a teacher to engage in coaching. Time is a very real beast. We need to take it on, by the horns, and not let it be an excuse. What we prioritize gets done. So let's prioritze coaching.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:15 Elena Aguilar
7:15
Anthony Rebora: 
Elena: We've got quite a few questions on the challenges of working with "resistant" teachers. Here's an example from Lane:
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:15 Anthony Rebora
7:15
[Comment From LaneLane: ] 
How do we begin to reach out to teachers who have the mindset, "You can't tell me how to teach?"
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:15 Lane
7:16
Elena Aguilar: 
Yup. There are lots of "resistant" teachers out there...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:16 Elena Aguilar
7:16
Elena Aguilar: 
This is a big topic, and there's so much to say about it. I recently wrote a few blog posts on my EdWeek Teacher blog about this topic. First thing is to take apart what "resistant" means...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:16 Elena Aguilar
7:17
Elena Aguilar: 
But let me respond to Lane's question. I'd respond to these teachers with something along the lines of, "I don't want to tell you how to teach. I want to have some conversations about teaching with you. I want to listen to you reflect on your teaching."
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:17 Elena Aguilar
7:17
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
I have been a coach for 2 high schools for one year. I feel I have done an inadequate job and next year will be at only one high school. Although I will be taking on asst. principal responsibilities also. Does your book/webinar cover how to balance all the hats we have to where in the education profession these days? With so many responsibilities, I feel I can only be mediocre in all of them!
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:17 Guest
7:18
Elena Aguilar: 
This is a meaty question because it raises another beast that we need to tackle...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:18 Elena Aguilar
7:19
Elena Aguilar: 
I believe that if all of us aren't intentionally engaged in changing this profession in a deep way then it's not worth all the work. What I mean is that rather than trying to accomodate to being asked to wear a million hats and run ourselves ragged, we push back on that...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:19 Elena Aguilar
7:20
Elena Aguilar: 
Design your job based on goals and outcomes. And insist that those are reasonable and that there's an alignment between what you do/or are asked to do, and how you spend your time. Of course you feel mediocre in all those roles--how could you feel successful when you're spread across so much work? So insist on narrowing and defining and doing what you're good at.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:20 Elena Aguilar
7:20
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Building off of Lane's question, how do you reach teachers who are still a mindset of blaming the students themselves?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:20 Guest
7:21
Elena Aguilar: 
Oh, such good questions! This one, like so many others, raises so much. One thing I've learned is that those teachers who are blaming students often feel really crappy about themselves. That's not the technical language, I know, but I know that's what's going on for many--they've lost their power, their agency, their ability to help kids...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:21 Elena Aguilar
7:22
Elena Aguilar: 
They're still challenging. I think we have to develop relationships with them, strong and trusting, and then we gently start to pry that stuff out of them--we support them to explore those underlying beliefs, to take responsibility for what they're saying and doing and believing, and we help them explore alternate ways to think or act.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:22 Elena Aguilar
7:23
Anthony Rebora: 
Interesting insight. Let's switch gears a bit.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:23 Anthony Rebora
7:23
[Comment From Sheri WilliamsSheri Williams: ] 
What are some effective ways to assess the impact of coaching on teacher practice?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:23 Sheri Williams
7:23
Elena Aguilar: 
Sheri--this is the question I love digging in to. It is THE essential question about coaching, for me anyway...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:23 Elena Aguilar
7:24
Elena Aguilar: 
Because this is a question about the value of coaching. Coaches (and those who manage and direct them) need to be thinking in this way -- thinking about designing ways for coaches to work that help us elicit this data. The next step of course is how do we link the impact of coaching to student experience and outcomes? Effective coaching changes teacher practice which improves student outcomes...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:24 Elena Aguilar
7:25
Elena Aguilar: 
In order to assess the impact of coaching on teacher practice, the work that coach and coachee do together needs to be sharply defined and agreed on. I believe that ALL coaches should work from work plans--plans that include goals and strategic actions and theories of action and such. This helps to narrow and define what happens when coach and coachee meet...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:25 Elena Aguilar
7:26
Elena Aguilar: 
And it gives us a clear place to look for evidence of impact. So for example, perhaps the teacher wants to work in the use of formative assessment. That is clear and measurable.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:26 Elena Aguilar
7:26
Anthony Rebora: 
These really are excellent questions, folks. Very impressive keep them coming.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:26 Anthony Rebora
7:27
Anthony Rebora: 
And here's a nice comment from Kelly.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:27 Anthony Rebora
7:27
[Comment From KellyKelly: ] 
Thanks you very much for the response about the many "hats" educators wear. I plan to use your suggestion in my contract negotiations next week!!
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:27 Kelly
7:27
Elena Aguilar: 
Glad to hear it, Kelly!
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:27 Elena Aguilar
7:27
Anthony Rebora: 
Yes, news you can use. That's what these chats are for.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:27 Anthony Rebora
7:28
Anthony Rebora: 
Elena, let's talk a little bit about technology--bunch of questions on that. Take this one from Sammie
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:28 Anthony Rebora
7:28
[Comment From SammieSammie: ] 
What about coaching off-site using technology... Skype, Bug-in-the ear, etc. Do you have data regarding the efficacy of off-site vs. on-site coaching? If you have found it effective, what technology works the best? Is it important to have developed an in-person relationship prior to using technology for coaching?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:28 Sammie
7:29
Elena Aguilar: 
Ok, Sammie raises many questions that I'm hearing a lot about these days. I have strong feelings about them, in spite of how much I'm enjoying using this technology, right now, to engage in this conversation...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:29 Elena Aguilar
7:29
Elena Aguilar: 
I'm a strong believer in one on one conversations, the kind where you look someone in the eyes and you notice the tension drop from their jaw and you see the deep sighs expressions when they come to a realization...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:29 Elena Aguilar
7:31
Elena Aguilar: 
If a coaching relationship is ever going to be digital, or to use technology, I think it's imperative that a strong in-person relationship already be established. I don't know how I'd coach without all the non-verbal communication I observe. So many of the poeple I coach express themselves non-verbally. Those are critical cues for me...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:31 Elena Aguilar
7:31
Elena Aguilar: 
I have used a "bug in the ear" strategy for in the moment feedback and that was really powerful...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:31 Elena Aguilar
7:31
Elena Aguilar: 
I think it's critical that teachers get in the momemt feedback actually, and if they really trust you and you're in the back of the room and you'll debrief in person afterwards, then I think it's great.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:31 Elena Aguilar
7:32
[Comment From BenjaminBenjamin: ] 
Do you see digital literacy/21st century skills integrating itself into instructional coaching positions, or do you think they should represented by a separate coach?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:32 Benjamin
7:33
Elena Aguilar: 
Benjamin, I think you're asking about a content area that a coach might provide support in. I think this question depends on the knowledge base and skill set of the coach. Ideally, I think an instructional coach could incorporate knowledge of these areas into a broader coaching support, but if he/she doesn't have that background then it might need to be a separte person.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:33 Elena Aguilar
7:34
Anthony Rebora: 
We have lots more on the theme of resistant/disengaged teachers. This one is maybe more of a comment than a question.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:34 Anthony Rebora
7:34
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
How do we motivate teachers to WANT to learn? I've asked my teachers (I'm a Math and Science Coach) what professional book they plan on reading over the summer and half the replies I received (on a survey I sent them) were left blank!!! Ugh!!! Aren't we in the business of LEARNING???
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:34 Guest
7:34
Elena Aguilar: 
Thanks for sharing this comment. First of all, I hear you! And I think it really raises the need for coaches to have their own support systems, teams, and coaches...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:34 Elena Aguilar
7:35
Elena Aguilar: 
I couldn't do my work effectively without having my people, a team who I can go to and ocassionally vent with! We see, hear, and deal with so much in our work as we try to shift people and organizations into being in a learning space...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:35 Elena Aguilar
7:36
Elena Aguilar: 
And so often, coaches aren't provided with the kind of support they need. I lead a team of coaches and we meet every week for six hours. SIX HOURS of PD, reflection, debriefing and supporting each other. This time feels essential to our success so that we can figure out how to respond for example, to teachers who aren't wanting to read a book this summer.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:36 Elena Aguilar
7:37
Anthony Rebora: 
I think this next one gets at the heart of your book:
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:37 Anthony Rebora
7:37
[Comment From Beth W.Beth W.: ] 
What might be your biggest 'go to' point in order to convince a district to create an instructional coaching position?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:37 Beth W.
7:37
Elena Aguilar: 
Oh, that is at the heart. Thank you, Beth!...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:37 Elena Aguilar
7:38
Elena Aguilar: 
My "go to" point would be: "Is what you're doing working for your students right now?" Are your teachers loving their jobs, excited to come to work, and staying in your district for many years? Is their practice improving? Are they meeting the needs that our students are showing up with? (Even if those needs are challenging)...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:38 Elena Aguilar
7:39
Elena Aguilar: 
I'd push on this, drive in that point: "Is this working?"...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:39 Elena Aguilar
7:39
Elena Aguilar: 
Are you seeing what you want to see from your teachers, leaders, students? And if not, then let's explore what coaching can do. It's a way for us to learn.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:39 Elena Aguilar
7:39
[Comment From EllenEllen: ] 
What are some suggestions for working with school boards whose members may not have an education background?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:39 Ellen
7:40
Elena Aguilar: 
I'm not sure about this question, Ellen. As a coach I haven't worked with school board members directly. Or indirectly. Can you explain this question?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:40 Elena Aguilar
7:41
Anthony Rebora: 
I'm not sure if Ellen is still online. I think she was just trying to get at the issue of explaining the importance of coaching to people you may not understand it or see any reason for it.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:41 Anthony Rebora
7:42
Elena Aguilar: 
Ok, I can address that...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:42 Elena Aguilar
7:42
Anthony Rebora: 
Particularly in reference to education/community leaders.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:42 Anthony Rebora
7:43
Elena Aguilar: 
If we frame coaching as a form of professional development, as a form that responds to what we know about adult learners, and if we remember that teachers (and everyone working in our schools) need to engage in continuous learning in order to meet the needs of our students, then we can talk about coaching...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:43 Elena Aguilar
7:44
Elena Aguilar: 
There are many analogies to draw on -- the coach on the field, (the athletic coach) the apprenticeship. In order to internalize a skill set, to improve our performance, we need someone giving us feedback, helping us see our blind spots. Coaching is an ideal way for that to happen in schools.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:44 Elena Aguilar
7:44
Anthony Rebora: 
A related comment from James:
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:44 Anthony Rebora
7:44
[Comment From JamesJames: ] 
School Board members like administrators seem to love data. What data can you give School Board members about the value of coaching?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:44 James
7:44
Elena Aguilar: 
That's a good one, James. And yes, it's true -- they love data...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:44 Elena Aguilar
7:45
Elena Aguilar: 
I think we need to shift this conversation also, to broaden their understanding of what data is, and what data is valuable...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:45 Elena Aguilar
7:45
Elena Aguilar: 
There are some studies that have recently come out that are serious research studies that demonstrate the impact of coaching. The Penn. Institute for INstructional coaching released a report earlier this year that shows some powerful data of the impact of coaching over three years...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:45 Elena Aguilar
7:46
Elena Aguilar: 
We need to seek out and gather this data and then share it, as well as data from our schools and districts that shows the need for teachers to improve their practice and continue learning.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:46 Elena Aguilar
7:47
Anthony Rebora: 
Excellent. There were a couple of questions about whether there is research supporting instructional coaching. So I think you covered that.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:47 Anthony Rebora
7:47
Elena Aguilar: 
Can I add?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:47 Elena Aguilar
7:47
Anthony Rebora: 
Sure. Of course,
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:47 Anthony Rebora
7:47
Elena Aguilar: 
I think some of the most interesting research is around how adults learn, and the brain science behind our learning needs...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:47 Elena Aguilar
7:48
Elena Aguilar: 
For example, those amazing brain scientists have all kinds of data about what our brains need in order to feel safe to be able to take risks and learn--the kind of emotional safety we need. We can't keep ignoring this data. We can't expect to continue yelling at teachers and telling them that it's their fault that students aren't performing and expect them to want to learn and grow...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:48 Elena Aguilar
7:49
Elena Aguilar: 
I'm not implying that anyone here is doing that, of course! I think it's the dominant national discourse...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:49 Elena Aguilar
7:49
Elena Aguilar: 
Teachers are responsible for everything wrong in a community, for the "failure" of schools and kids and so on....
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:49 Elena Aguilar
7:50
Elena Aguilar: 
If we want teachers to show up as learners, willing to reflect on their practice and look at data, then we need to find ways to make them feel safe. We need to listen and look them in the eyes and listen and listen and listen. And then we can ask some harder questions and provide feedback. That's the research I thikn we should all be reading and learning more deeply (at least I want to) and that we could use more strategically in trying to convince others of the need for coaching.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:50 Elena Aguilar
7:50
[Comment From AshleyAshley: ] 
In your opinion should coaching take place in one school or across many schools? In our district we are attempting to utilize the strengths of the coaches(specific grades taught) and weigh the pros and the cons of sharing a school.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:50 Ashley
7:51
Elena Aguilar: 
Great question, Ashley. I have seen both models used and am not entirely sure what I think. The coaches that I lead this year are "centrally" based and work across three schools...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:51 Elena Aguilar
7:52
Elena Aguilar: 
So they specialize in a content and grade level ("6th grade math"). They also each have a "home site" where they lead departments and participate in the leadership team. They take lead in communicating with the other coaches so we're all on the same page...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:52 Elena Aguilar
7:53
Elena Aguilar: 
I think the danger with site based coaches is that they're pulled into all kinds of work that isn't about coaching. They become substitutes and yard duty teachers and bulletin-board posters. It's so much easier to delineate roles sharply when spread across schools.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:53 Elena Aguilar
7:53
Anthony Rebora: 
A follow-up from Kelly:
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:53 Anthony Rebora
7:53
[Comment From KellyKelly: ] 
Ashley...from a coach that was shared between grades, schools etc.....BAD IDEA. You have a hard time following up and staying on top of a schools needs!
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:53 Kelly
7:54
[Comment From ShelleyShelley: ] 
Do you see Lesson Study becoming a part of instructional coaching? In my training as a Lesson Study Facilitator, it is important to be a "facilitator of learning" rather than a "coach", yet my administration wants to use Lesson Study as the primary means of instructional coaching.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:54 Shelley
7:54
Elena Aguilar: 
Kelly, how many schools were you spread across? Who supported, guided, and directed your work? I think being spread necessitates more coordination and direction.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:54 Elena Aguilar
7:55
Elena Aguilar: 
Shelley - I think a coach can facilitate lesson study. When our roles get blurry, it's even more important to develop relationships and communication strategies...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:55 Elena Aguilar
7:55
Elena Aguilar: 
We can cross boundaries, as long as everyone is clear about what hat we're wearing, what our intentions are, and what our purpose in that role is.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:55 Elena Aguilar
7:56
Anthony Rebora: 
Another guest chimes in on the site-based vs. cross schools question:
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:56 Anthony Rebora
7:56
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
On the other hand, I worked with a single site-based coach who administered standardized tests and did remediation with children more often than working with teachers.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:56 Guest
7:56
Elena Aguilar: 
Yes, it's all about who constructs roles and responsibilities, who directs our work, how it's constructed, and towards what end.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:56 Elena Aguilar
7:56
Elena Aguilar: 
Site-based and cross-site is probably not the right frame to determine the best coaching model.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:56 Elena Aguilar
7:57
Anthony Rebora: 
ON a different note:
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:57 Anthony Rebora
7:57
[Comment From BrentBrent: ] 
How do you suggest we build capacity for our coaches to have courageous conversations with their peers? Or how do we take relationships from collegial to collaborative?
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:57 Brent
7:58
Elena Aguilar: 
Brent, great question! I'm so glad you ask about building capacity for coaches -- that's essential. Most of us don't enter a coaching role knowing how to do these things...
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:58 Elena Aguilar
7:58
Elena Aguilar: 
We need PD! We need to engage in inquiry cycles with each other, in observation of each other, we need to learn more about communication. The "how" is out there; it's when and where does this happen that we need to talk about and advocate for.
Thursday June 6, 2013 7:58 Elena Aguilar
8:00
Anthony Rebora: 
I'm sorry to say that's all time time we have tonight. Excellent discussion though. Thanks for the great questions--this was really an informed audience--perhaps not surprising given the topic.

And thanks to Elena for her generosity in sharing her time and knowledge. Please check out her book:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Art-Coaching-Strategies-Transformation/dp/1118206533/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1370559428&sr=1-1

And don't forget to read her great blog:
http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/coaching_teachers
Thursday June 6, 2013 8:00 Anthony Rebora
8:01
Elena Aguilar: 
Thank you, Anthony, and all who participated!
Thursday June 6, 2013 8:01 Elena Aguilar
8:02
Bryan Toporek: 
Thanks, Anthony and Elena! That's a great place to end.
Thursday June 6, 2013 8:02 Bryan Toporek
8:03
Bryan Toporek: 
Folks, thanks again for joining us for today's free Education Week Teacher chat, Harnessing the Power of Instructional Coaches. We'd like to extend a special thanks to our fantastic guest, Elena, and our moderator Anthony as well.

Thursday June 6, 2013 8:03 Bryan Toporek
8:03
Bryan Toporek: 

We'll be posting a transcript of today's chat on this same page within the next 20-30 minutes. Thanks again for joining us tonight, and have a great rest of the week!

Thursday June 6, 2013 8:03 Bryan Toporek
8:04
 

 
 
 

Harnessing the Potential of Instructional Coaching

Thursday, June 6, 2013, 7 to 8 p.m. ET

Instructional coaching—increasingly pointed to as a promising approach for helping teachers improve their craft—is gaining traction in many school systems. But what makes a good coach?

In this live chat, Elena Aguilar, author of the recently published The Art of Coaching, took your questions on the complicated, often mysterious processes that go into what she calls "transformational coaching." She explored the challenges that teacher-coaches face in their day-to-day work and offered practical tips on developing strong coaching relationships and outcomes. She also discussed ways to maximize the impact of instructional coaches in school-improvement efforts.

Guest:
Elena Aguilar, instructional and leadership coach, Oakland Unified School District, Calif., and author, The Art of Coaching: Effective Strategies for School Transformation. Aguilar also writes Education Week Teacher’s blog The Art of Coaching Teachers. (@ArtofCoaching1)

Anthony Rebora, managing editor, Education Week Teacher, moderated this chat.

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.
The Fine Print

All questions are screened by an edweek.org editor prior to posting. A question is not displayed until the moderator poses it to the guest(s). Due to the volume of questions received, we cannot guarantee that all questions will be answered, or answered in the order of submission. Guests and hosts may decline to answer any questions. Concise questions are strongly encouraged.

Please be sure to include your name when posting your question.

Edweek.org's Live Chat is an open forum where readers can participate in a give- and-take discussion with a variety of guests. Edweek.org reserves the right to condense or edit questions for clarity, but editing is kept to a minimum. Transcripts may also be reproduced in some form in our print edition. We do not correct errors in spelling, punctuation, etc. In addition, we remove statements that have the potential to be libelous or to slander someone. Please read our privacy policy and user agreement if you have questions.

—Chat Editors

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented

MORE EDUCATION JOBS >>