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Mapping Curriculum to the ELA Common Standards

Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 4 to 5 p.m. ET
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 Mapping Curriculum to the ELA Common Standards(03/06/2013) 
8:48
Bryan Toporek: 
Good morning and welcome to today's chat, Mapping Curriculum to the ELA Common Standards. I've just opened the chat for questions, so please start submitting yours below.

We'll be back at 4 p.m. ET with author Kathy Glass. We hope to see you then!
Wednesday March 6, 2013 8:48 Bryan Toporek
3:49
Bryan Toporek: 
Thanks again for joining us for today's chat, Mapping Curriculum to the ELA Common Standards. We'll get started right at the top of the hour with our special guest, author Kathy Glass.

In the meantime, please continue to submit your questions below. Thanks!
Wednesday March 6, 2013 3:49 Bryan Toporek
3:59
Bryan Toporek: 
I'm passing control of the chat over to today's moderator, Liana Heitin, the associate editor of Education Week Teacher. Take it away, Liana!
Wednesday March 6, 2013 3:59 Bryan Toporek
3:59
Liana Heitin: 
Hi everyone and welcome to our chat on Mapping Curriculum to the ELA Common Standards. Thanks for being with us this afternoon. Our guest today is author and educator Kathy T. Glass. Kathy, would you mind telling everyone a little bit about yourself?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 3:59 Liana Heitin
4:00
Kathy Glass: 
Hello, everyone! Thanks for joining me today. I’ve been asked to introduce myself, so here is a brief intro: I’m a former teacher who consults/presents nationally with K-12 educators. My area of expertise is in professional development around curriculum and instruction, such as differentiation, curriculum mapping, backward design, six traits, Common Core State Standards (CCSS), etc. I’ve published 6 books through Corwin Press; my latest 2 are on mapping and designing units aligned to the ELA CCSS. Corwin link: http://www.corwin.com/authors/529812 . My website is www.kathyglassconsulting.com.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:00 Kathy Glass
4:01
Kathy Glass: 
To begin, I want to provide an overview of what mapping a unit of study entails which is our topic for today & what I do w/clients regularly. I also do work w/curriculum mapping across grades and buildings (vertically and horizontally), but this is particularly a focus on UNIT MAPPING. It will set the stage for our talk this hour…
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:01 Kathy Glass
4:01
Kathy Glass: 
Mapping units is a backward design process that involves identifying key components of a targeted instructional unit to provide a framework for intensive study. Key components include: (1) group CCSS and content-area STANDARDS (as appropriate); (2) identify the factual info that students should KNOW; (3) develop essential (or enduring) UNDERSTANDINGS for conceptual focus; (4) craft unit and lesson GUIDING QUESTIONS; (5) pinpoint key SKILLS; (6) determine ACTIVITIES and ASSESSMENTS; (7) select appropriate RESOURCES; (8) consider ways to DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION for activities, assessments, and resources. Using this comprehensive unit map, educators then devise specific lessons.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:01 Kathy Glass
4:02
Liana Heitin: 
Excellent. Thanks, Kathy. Let’s get started. We’ve got a lot of great questions coming in.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:02 Liana Heitin
4:02
Liana Heitin: 
This one is on existing curriculum.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:02 Liana Heitin
4:02
[Comment From CSCS: ] 
Is it possible to use current curriculum (Houghton Mifflin) and ramp up the questioning to meet ELA CCSS? Or do we need to really revamp the whole program?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:02 CS
4:03
Kathy Glass: 
CS: Yes, it is possible to revise your current curriculum instead of creating all new units from scratch. I’m all about revising what you already have to align to the CCSS. My book actually walks you through how you might do this as there are exercises geared to creating a new unit or revising an existing one. There are examples, templates, and explanations so you can do this. Be prepared, though, to supplement your curriculum with additional resources and revise lessons. I find w/my clients that we certainly need to create text-dept. questions and focus energies there, too.>
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:03 Kathy Glass
4:03
Liana Heitin: 
Terrific. And one on ELL's from Prof. Bruno.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:03 Liana Heitin
4:04
[Comment From Prof. M. BrunoProf. M. Bruno: ] 
In order to serve the ELL population equitably the process must be deliberate (as per the experts) Will this curriculum mapping to the ELA common standards address the issue of the English As a Second Language learner? I are the ELLs to be identified, integrated and assessed into the shift of the CCSS and aligned with the TESOL standards?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:04 Prof. M. Bruno
4:04
Kathy Glass: 
Prof. Bruno: Curriculum mapping—if done correctly—addresses the needs of all students, including ELLs, as educators are expected to differentiate for all populations.
...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:04 Kathy Glass
4:05
Kathy Glass: 
Prof. Bruno AND others interested in ELL: Here’s a link from the CCSS: “Application of the CCSS for ELL”
http://www.corestandards.org/assets/application-for-english-learners.pdf
...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:05 Kathy Glass
4:06
Kathy Glass: 

ELL RESOURCE: Learn more about how the CCSS will impact ELLs and their educators, families, and districts from the following resource: “What Does the Common Core Mean for ELLs?”

http://www.colorincolorado.org/educators/common_core/ell/
... 

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:06 Kathy Glass
4:06
Kathy Glass: 

Prof Bruno: You specifically mentioned TESOL standards. The info in “Standards That Impact ELL” from Dr. Diane S. Fenner and John Segota of TESOL might help you.  It “discusses the relationship between language proficiency standards, professional teaching standards, and the Common Core.” There is a lot of rich info in this link and others embedded in the site including updates on activities currently underway with WIDA and TESOL. http://www.colorincolorado.org/educators/common_core/ell/proficiency/  >

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:06 Kathy Glass
4:07
Liana Heitin: 
Great. This one's from Andrew.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:07 Liana Heitin
4:07
[Comment From Andrew ListerAndrew Lister: ] 
What are some effective strategies for infusing grammar instruction into the new Common Core curriculum?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:07 Andrew Lister
4:07
Kathy Glass: 
Andrew: Another good question. Look at the grade level CCSS as a guide under the LANGUAGE strand which are your grammar and conventions standards. I’m a major advocate for teaching grammar w/in a unit of study & not in isolation...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:07 Kathy Glass
4:08
Kathy Glass: 
Then use engaging instructional strategies that get kids moving, thinking, and doing.  Try matching and sorting activities tactilely or kinesthetically. For ex., have cards with subjects and other cards with predicates – ask kids to match them. Have the word NOUN on one card and several cards with proper nouns, mass nouns, common nouns. Have kids walk around the room and find their “family.” Other cards: VERBS with SAUNTER, JUMP, TO DIVE, IS, and match that “family,” etc.... 
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:08 Kathy Glass
4:09
Kathy Glass: 

Kids should be expected to detect the skill you’ve taught in published work and use the skill you’ve taught in their own writing. That’s the big goal!

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:09 Kathy Glass
4:09
Liana Heitin: 
This one is on grouping standards.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:09 Liana Heitin
4:09
[Comment From GinaGina: ] 
What way do you think is best for grouping the ELA CCSS for mapping?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:09 Gina
4:10
Kathy Glass: 
First you have to identify your targeted unit. For example, one on weather or on American Revolution or on narrative writing. Even if it's science or social studies, you'll use the ELA CCSS in conjunction with your content area standards...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:10 Kathy Glass
4:11
Kathy Glass: 

Then, you determine what standards you will formally teach and group them together. Keep in mind that even tho the CCSS are in 4 strands, you'll want to go for an interdiscplinary approach....

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:11 Kathy Glass
4:12
Kathy Glass: 
That means that if you have kids produce a research paper, you'll want the content and of course reading and writing standards. But you'll also need some language standars....
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:12 Kathy Glass
4:13
Kathy Glass: 

For example, students are supposed to cite appropriately. Not just in the works cited document, but also in within the body of the paper. They need to know how to use quotation marks and then parentheses to cite their sources. That's where the language strand can come into play along with the others that are pertinent. >

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:13 Kathy Glass
4:13
Liana Heitin: 
Great stuff. Here's a question on your approach.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:13 Liana Heitin
4:13
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Beach, Haertling-Thein, & Webb in their book on teaching the CCSS in ELA (2011)argue for an approach with the CCSS that starts with "constructing classroom events and spaces for meaningful activities" (p. 43). But it seems like your curriculum development process starts with the Standards. Do you see any pitfalls with designing curriculum first and aligning later?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:13 Guest
4:14
Kathy Glass: 
Good question. I use the backward design model that Wiggins and McTighe popularized and others have used for years. It begins with standards because that's the guiding light and the goal....
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:14 Kathy Glass
4:15
Kathy Glass: 
Once you identify what standards you are shooting for, you then identify from those standards what you want students to know (factual info), understand, and be able to do (skills). That's the overarching goals of your unit of instruction...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:15 Kathy Glass
4:16
Kathy Glass: 
Then you determine what evidence students will show you that proves they have mastered the skills and essential (or enduring understandings) and the key facts pertinent to your unit. After you have done all of this upfront planning, you are then ready to design engaging, impactful lessons to get to where you intend to go.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:16 Kathy Glass
4:16
Kathy Glass: 
It's a matter of determining what your key goals are and finding a way to teach so they realize these goals.>
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:16 Kathy Glass
4:16
Liana Heitin: 
Here's a question I know a lot of teachers are asking about the nonfiction reading requirements:
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:16 Liana Heitin
4:16
[Comment From ReginaRegina: ] 
I've heard a lot about fiction vs. nonfiction in the common standards. A lot of people are saying it's all about nonfiction now, but I feel like that's exaggerating what the standards what. What's the right balance between the two?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:16 Regina
4:17
Kathy Glass: 
There is a balance that the standards delientate in their Introduction. There are about 10 pages prior to the standards that give a lot of good information that is worth reading....
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:17 Kathy Glass
4:19
Kathy Glass: 

Students have not been exposed to enough nonfiction text to make them college and career ready. Reserach supports this. In fact, if you look in yoru own classroom libraries, I bet you find more fiction than nonfiction if you are an elementary teacher or a language arts teacher in middel and high school. The designers of the CCSS have created standards to make sure that kids are reading complex text critically across nonfiction and fiction genres. ...

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:19 Kathy Glass
4:20
Kathy Glass: 
That means that you want to be sure that your kids are exposed to not only mysteries, realistic fiction, dramas, poems, but also almanacs, science lab reports, mag and newspaper articles, technical manuals, photo essays, speeches, and all kinds of nonfiction...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:20 Kathy Glass
4:21
Kathy Glass: 
You can think of nonfiction comprised of 4 categories: 
  • biography
  • autobiography
  • memoir
  • informational... 
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:21 Kathy Glass
4:23
Kathy Glass: 
The first 3 bullets have a narrative flavor to them. They have similar characteristics like setting and character. They are sometimes easier to read than the other type of nonfiction - INFORMATIONAL. This type of nonfiction includes essays, reports, observational notes, technoical manuals, textrbooks, articles, websites...and is sometimes more challenging to read. But we need to expose our kids to these types of works so they are ready for college and careers. ...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:23 Kathy Glass
4:24
Kathy Glass: 
The language arts teachers in middle and high schools will still have kids read dramas, novels, short stories, and other types of fiction. This is actually stated in the actual CCSS document. What is important is that teachers in other content areas share the role of literacy with their ELA teacher-colleagues and expose kids to more informational text.  Whew! Long answer, folks. :) >
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:24 Kathy Glass
4:24
Liana Heitin: 
Perhaps the most comprehensive answer I've heard on this! Very helpful. Tabitha has a somewhat philosophical question:
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:24 Liana Heitin
4:25
[Comment From TabithaTabitha: ] 
How do you define "rigor" in the curriculum?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:25 Tabitha
4:25
[Comment From MichelleMichelle: ] 
Where can teachers find the best digital resources for teaching ELA to the common standards?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:25 Michelle
4:25
Liana Heitin: 
Whoops, sorry about that! You can take Michelle's question next. :)
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:25 Liana Heitin
4:27
Kathy Glass: 
Ahhh...rigor. A lot of folks are asking about that because the word gets bantered around a lot. If you were to read Appendix A of the CCSS document, you'll feel better equipped to understand why the focus is on text complexity and nonfiction. The reserach about why comoplexity is important shows how the textbooks have lost a lot of the depth and rigor in more recent years. But yet students are still expected to perform at the same level of excellence once they exit high school.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:27 Kathy Glass
4:28
Kathy Glass: 

There are a lot of digital resources. I'll get back to you on some that I have found once I dig them up. I included a Resources section in my upcoming book that I'll share with you. More later when I find it. >

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:28 Kathy Glass
4:28
Liana Heitin: 
Thanks, Kathy. And back to Michelle's question on digital resources.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:28 Liana Heitin
4:29
Liana Heitin: 
(She wants to know where to find them for the ELA standards.)
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:29 Liana Heitin
4:29
Kathy Glass: 
I found the resources, but am not sure I can cut and paste well. This isn't just for ELA teachers, but for others, too...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:29 Kathy Glass
4:29
Kathy Glass: 

·       Bubbl.us (a tool that allows students to visually web/map understanding of words and concepts; free alternative to Kidspiration) https://bubbl.us/

·       CAST UDL (Universal Design for Learning) Exchange (online site to browse and build resources, lessons, and collections to support instruction guided by UDL principles; UDL is a set of principles to develop learning environments that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn and proposes a set of flexible scaffolds and supports to meet individual needs) www.udlexchange.cast.org/home

·       Google search lessons (complete lessons for research projects; e.g., finding the right search terms, evaluating credibility of sources, etc.) www.google.com/insidesearch/searcheducation/lessons.html

·       Google docs (online word processor for creating and formatting text documents and collaborate with others in real time) www.docs.google.com/

·       graphic organizers:

o   www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer/

o   www.edhelper.com/teachers/graphic_organizers.htm

o   www.teachervision.fen.com/graphic-organizers/printable/6293.html

o   www.freeology.com/graphicorgs/

o   www.educationoasis.com/curriculum/graphic_organizers.htm

o   http://edselect.com/worksheets-lesson-plans#Graphic%20Organizers

·       Learning Ally (collection of more than 75,000 digitally recorded textbooks and literature titles that can be downloaded and accessible on mainstream and specialized assistive technology devices) www.learningally.org/

·       LibriVox (free audiobooks from the public domain; several options for listening) www.librivox.org/

·       Many Books (more than 29,000 free Ebooks) www.manybooks.net/

·       Poem Hunter (database of poems) www.poemhunter.com/

·       Purdue Online Writing Lab (writing resources to use across content areas; especially helpful for research projects) http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

·       Reading Like a Historian (curriculum project from Stanford University; includes a series of lessons that engages students in historical inquiry by investigating essential questions through careful analysis of primary source documents) http://sheg.stanford.edu/node/45

·       ReadWriteThink (compilation of lesson plans, activities, and other ideas) www.readadwritethink.org/classroom-resources/

·       Storynory (free audiobooks of original stories, fairy tales, myths and histories, poems) http://storynory.com/

·       Teacher Tube (online community site for educators and students to share instructional videos) http://teachertube.com/

·       VoiceThread (digital tool for sharing stories or conversations with people around the world via voice, text, audio file, or video) http://voicethread.com/

·       WebQuests (web-based software for creating WebQuests in a short time without writing any HTML codes; see other educators’ Webquests, as well) www.zunal.com/

·       Wordle (tool to generate “word clouds” from text that students provide) www.wordle.net/

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:29 Kathy Glass
4:30
Liana Heitin: 
Wow, excellent. Thanks.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:30 Liana Heitin
4:30
Liana Heitin: 
And a question from Jessica:
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:30 Liana Heitin
4:30
[Comment From JessicaJessica: ] 
As a social studies teacher, should I worry about incorporating fiction or just focus on informational text?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:30 Jessica
4:30
Kathy Glass: 
Oh...I misunderstood your questions but thought to send the digital resources anyway b/c I think they could help you all. The folks I consult with find them very useful, so my hunch is you will too. Now back to the CCSS resources...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:30 Kathy Glass
4:31
Kathy Glass: 
Let's start with an overview. There are 3 Appendices: A, B, C.

Appendix A: “Research Supporting Key Elements of the Standards & Glossary of Key Terms”

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_A.pdf

READING – research about why complexity matters, 3-part model for measuring text complexity, model in action to show how it works, foundational skills supplements (phoneme-grapheme correspondences, phonological awareness, etc.); WRITING – definitions of the 3 text types;  VOCABULARY – 3 tiers; etc.

...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:31 Kathy Glass
4:32
Kathy Glass: 
Now for Appendix B:
 

Appendix B: “Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks”

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf

Listing of text samples and titles in grade level bands (K-1, 2-3, 4-5, 6-8, 9-10, 11-CCR). They serve to exemplify the level of complexity and quality expected in the CCSS in grade bands. The choices provide useful guideposts in helping educators to select texts of similar complexity, quality, and range. Brief performance tasks are presented that clarify the meaning of the Standards.

 ... I'm not done yet. Embarassed

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:32 Kathy Glass
4:33
Kathy Glass: 

And finally:

Appendix C: “Samples of Student Writing”

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_C.pdf

Be careful how you use this Appendix b/c you can't assume that each student sample is exemplary. Some are and some aren't. These represent at least the level of criteria, which doesn't mean they are all top level. Use selected samples in your instructional program to show strenghts as well as weaknesses. > 

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:33 Kathy Glass
4:34
Kathy Glass: 
Jessica had a question about social studies
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:34 Kathy Glass
4:34
Liana Heitin: 
(Just so our readers know, this chat will be archived and they can come back and find these resources later.)
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:34 Liana Heitin
4:35
Kathy Glass: 
Yes, as a social studies teacher you have an opportunity to teach cool nonfiction texts particulary biographies, autobiographies, and informational text. You'll introduce primary source materials as well as secondary source material...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:35 Kathy Glass
4:36
Kathy Glass: 

You surely can teach historical fiction as long as you have a balance with other nonfiction. Here's the split between literary and informational text according to the CCSS. All of you should know this for whatever subject you teach...

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:36 Kathy Glass
4:37
Kathy Glass: 

up to 4th grade: 50 % literary; 50% informational
5th to 8th grades: 45% literary; 55% informational
9th to 12th grades: 30% literary; 70% informational... 

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:37 Kathy Glass
4:38
Kathy Glass: 
So you can see that as students advance in the grades it is incumbant upon teachers to introduce more informational text. >
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:38 Kathy Glass
4:38
Liana Heitin: 
From Ayn:
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:38 Liana Heitin
4:38
[Comment From Ayn GrubbAyn Grubb: ] 
How would you describe the difference between autobiography and memoir?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:38 Ayn Grubb
4:40
Kathy Glass: 

OF course...that's a popular question I shoudl have anticipated. :) They are both self-written about one's own life. Autobiography entails writing about one's entire life. Memoir is about a particular time in one's life that was particularly noteworthy like a death, divorce, major accomplishment, period in office, etc. >

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:40 Kathy Glass
4:40
Liana Heitin: 
Ha, I've never heard that explanation. Great. And a question on differentiation:
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:40 Liana Heitin
4:40
[Comment From LLLL: ] 
Can you give examples of the way you might differentiate instruction--for example, in a unit on persuasive/analytic writing?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:40 LL
4:41
Kathy Glass: 
Yes. First off, know that in the CCSS there are 3 writing types: (1) opinion/argument; (2) informational/explanatory; (3) narrative...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:41 Kathy Glass
4:43
Kathy Glass: 
So when you talk about a persuasive unit, be careful that it's more argumentation. In Appendix A of the CCSS, you'll find a couple pages that define these writing types more specifically. If you were to think about Socrates' rhetoric - logos, pathos, ethos - the goal of argumentation is more on LOGOS - the logical argument. Students must be able to defend their arguments with evidence from sources. That's critically important. Don't have them rely so much on emotinoal appeal...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:43 Kathy Glass
4:44
Kathy Glass: 
Now back to your question. To differentiate, allow students to select a topic that is the basis for their argumentation. (Back to basics: in the CCSS OPINION PIECE is for the K-5 kids; ARGUMENTATION is for the 6-12.) ...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:44 Kathy Glass
4:45
Kathy Glass: 
STudents will be more engaged in their writing if they can choose their topics. Even if you tied it to a social studies unit like the American Revolution, you could still let them select. They could write an argument from the point of view of a tory or loyalist or neutralist rather than the teacher dictating everyone has to respond from King George's point of view. ...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:45 Kathy Glass
4:46
Kathy Glass: 
Also, provide support with thesis writing. Some kids can create one from scratch and it's right on target; others need more support. Also differentiate by the resources they are using to create their papers. Help students find the appropriately challenging resources that are right for them. >
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:46 Kathy Glass
4:46
Kathy Glass: 

Christy: You are welcome! ReadWriteThink is an excellent resource!

Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:46 Kathy Glass
4:47
Liana Heitin: 
Here's another philosophical question about standardization. It's from Michael.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:47 Liana Heitin
4:47
[Comment From Michael MauneMichael Maune: ] 
How does your approach address the "leaky bucket" syndrome that Grover Whitehurst identified, where implementation of the standards from district to district and classroom to classroom varies so much that it's hard to say they are having any kind of "standardizing" impact?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:47 Michael Maune
4:49
Kathy Glass: 
I think it's important that teachers have the ability to find, create, revise curriculum and use their passions and their individuality to teach as long as they are in alignment with the standards. In fact, the CCSS state explicitly that they define what students should know and be able to do but not tell teachers how to go about it. That's part of the fun of teaching to determine the how. ...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:49 Kathy Glass
4:50
Kathy Glass: 
I am sure that some districts don't implement the standards to the fidelity that they should be and also might not use a research-based way of implementing them. But if they do, and the rigor is there, I think folks can create or find some wonderful units...
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:50 Kathy Glass
4:52
Kathy Glass: 
When I work with districts on creating or revising units, I make sure that they follow a process and that their work is aligned to standards and proven methods. I even began sharing a rubric so that what teachers produce is quality-drivein. The Tri-State has a rubric, too, that you can google and find. So it's a matter of creating quality work aligned with the CCSS and there are many avenues to get there. >
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:52 Kathy Glass
4:53
Liana Heitin: 
OK folks, we've got less than 10 minutes left, so please get your final burning questions in now!
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:53 Liana Heitin
4:53
Liana Heitin: 
Here's a good one from Jonathan.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:53 Liana Heitin
4:53
[Comment From JonathanJonathan: ] 
You mentioned above the importance of putting guiding questions in your lessons and units. Should teachers actually write them out? Should they present them to students? How should teachers determine these questions?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:53 Jonathan
4:55
Kathy Glass: 
Guiding questions emanate from standards, so teachers are creating them from these expectations. I have teachers use lesson guiding questions to set the objective for the day and post unit guiding questions on an easel or chart paper to stay up the entire unit long. These questions serve a purpose for student learning. The unit guiding quetsions are more global, and the lesson guiding quetsions are needed to be able to answer those unit questions. So they are scaffolded and represent what lesons teachers are conducting. >
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:55 Kathy Glass
4:57
Liana Heitin: 
OK, here's a big question from an educator who is moving to standards-based grading.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:57 Liana Heitin
4:57
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Are there standards that should be incorporated or bundled together systematically...or when mapping, are they mapping each standard individually? We are trying to move to standards based report cards, and reporting on each standard individually is difficult, but if are learning targets that include multiple standards, it makes it easier to plan curriculum as well as plan a means of reporting progress.
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:57 Guest
4:59
Kathy Glass: 
Yes, standards are systematically bundled together based on the unit you are teaching. For example, if you are teaching a narrative unit, you'll want to group specific READING FOR LITERATURE standards based on maybe a text you are teaching. You'll want students to produce a narrative piece of writing, so you'll use that standard for narrative WRITING. You'll probably want students to include dialogue in that story they are writing, so you want to include LANGUAGE standards so they punctuate their dialogue correctly and use the right conventions and grammar all throughout their story....
Wednesday March 6, 2013 4:59 Kathy Glass
5:01
Kathy Glass: 
So you create a unit map that groups standards according to each unit of study. I would work as a grade level and school group to determine what standards to group together for each major unit of study. Then, like you said well, "it makes it easier to plan curriculum as well as plan a means of reporting progress." >
Wednesday March 6, 2013 5:01 Kathy Glass
5:01
Liana Heitin: 
Unfortunately that’s all the time we have for today. Thanks so much to Kathy for spending the hour with us and answering our questions so insightfully. And a big thanks to all of you for participating. Any quick last words, Kathy?
Wednesday March 6, 2013 5:01 Liana Heitin
5:02
Kathy Glass: 
Yes, thanks Bryan and Liana for putting this chat session on and to all of you who participated! Great hour of questions.

Here’s my website if you want to check out some downloadable resources, books, and specifics about my topics. There are tools there for you - templates, examples, etc. Sign up for my PD 360 group if you want monthly resources that i send out and to chat with other colleagues. It's on the website. Good luck!! Kathy >

www.kathyglassconsulting.com

Wednesday March 6, 2013 5:02 Kathy Glass
5:03
Bryan Toporek: 
Thanks, Kathy! That's a great way to wrap up. Folks, thanks again for braving the snow and joining us today. A special thanks to our great guest, Kathy Glass, and our moderator Liana.

The transcript of today's chat will be posted on this same page within the hour. Have a great rest of the day!
Wednesday March 6, 2013 5:03 Bryan Toporek
5:03
 

 
 
 

Mapping Curriculum to the ELA Common Standards

Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 4 to 5 p.m. ET

The Common Core State Standards present a framework of expectations for K-12 students—they are not, as their architects and supporters are quick to point out, a curriculum. That leaves educators with the daunting task of planning exactly how and what students will learn in a given year in order to reach the new benchmarks for knowledge and skills. And with the deadlines for common-core implementation approaching, educators need to be doing this work now.

In this chat, Kathy Glass, author of two books on Mapping Comprehensive Units to the ELA Common Core Standards, for K–5 and for 6-12, discussed how to translate the new English/language arts standards into effective curriculum units. She answered questions on developing unit maps, differentiating instruction, making connections across units, and building common core-aligned lessons and units that are both rigorous and relevant to students.

Guest:
Kathy T. Glass, author, Mapping Comprehensive Units to the ELA Common Core Standards

Liana Heitin, associate editor, Education Week Teacher, moderated this chat.

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