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Getting the Most Out of iPads in the Classroom

Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, 5 to 6 p.m. ET
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 Getting the Most Out of iPads in the Classroom(01/08/2013) 
8:34
Bryan Toporek: 
Good morning and welcome to today's free live EdWeekTeacher chat, "Getting the Most Out of iPads in the Classroom." I've just opened the chat for questions, so please start submitting yours below.

We'll be back at 5 p.m. ET with Jennie Magiera -- we hope to see you then!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 8:34 Bryan Toporek
4:53
Bryan Toporek: 
Good afternoon, folks! We'll be getting underway with today's chat, "Getting the Most Out of iPads in the Classroom," in just a few minutes.

In the meantime, please keep submitting any questions that you have below. Thanks!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 4:53 Bryan Toporek
5:00
Bryan Toporek: 
Alright, I'm going to turn the chat over to Francesca Duffy, our moderator for the day. Take it away, Francesca!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:00 Bryan Toporek
5:01
Francesca Duffy: 
Welcome! Today we will be chatting with Jennie Magiera, an Apple Distinguished Educator and the digital learning coordinator for the Academy of Urban School Leadership in Chicago, on the instructional use of digital tablets in the classroom. Welcome, Jennie! We look forward to hearing your advice during this live chat.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:01 Francesca Duffy
5:01
Jennie Magiera: 
Thanks Francesca! Hi Everyone - I’m excited to chat with you all today! My name is Jennie Magiera. I am the Digital Learning Coordinator for the Academy for Urban School Leadership, a network of 25 neighborhood Chicago Public Schools. Previously I have been an intermediate teacher (with 1:1 iPads), math/tech coach and curriculum writer. Currently I’m supporting thirty 1:1 iPad classrooms in our network. For more info: @MsMagiera & teachinglikeits2999.blogspot.com
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:01 Jennie Magiera
5:01
Francesca Duffy: 
Great, let's get started everyone! Here is our first question to get the ball rolling:
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:01 Francesca Duffy
5:01
[Comment From Janet ThomsonJanet Thomson: ] 
Our school board provided each elementary school with one iPad. How can we make the most effective use of a single iPad in the school or if a teacher brings in their own iPad, in the classroom? At our school, we have purchased a cable to link the iPad to the Smartboard and we have Smartboards in each of our classrooms.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:01 Janet Thomson
5:02
Jennie Magiera: 
Ahh, this is a common challenge.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:02 Jennie Magiera
5:02
Jennie Magiera: 
First I would suggest considering purchasing AppleTVs.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:02 Jennie Magiera
5:02
Jennie Magiera: 
Using this device, you can create better versions of interactive whiteboards in each classroom that untethers the teacher from the whiteboard and allows more students to participate in the sharing /presenting.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:02 Jennie Magiera
5:03
Jennie Magiera: 
For more info: http://teachinglikeits2999.blogspot.com/2012/01/its-interactive-whiteboard-its-doc-cam.html
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:03 Jennie Magiera
5:04
Jennie Magiera: 
Next, I would see if you could consolidate some of these iPads - then create centers in rooms. Unfortunately a single iPad for 20-30 kids can't do a lot, however if you can make a center through which students can rotate, you can get some more transformative effects.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:04 Jennie Magiera
5:04
Francesca Duffy: 
And here is our next question from Jean:
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:04 Francesca Duffy
5:04
[Comment From JeanJean: ] 
What are the best ways you suggest to use iPads with primary grades (K, 1)?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:04 Jean
5:04
Jennie Magiera: 
At the primary level, the iPad's accessibility features really shine through.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:04 Jennie Magiera
5:05
Jennie Magiera: 
Start with Teacher-Created digital content:
Create your own iBooks using iBooks Author to differentiate student learning.
Also consider creating your own screencasts to teach students sight words, and other basic knowledge content skills
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:05 Jennie Magiera
5:06
Jennie Magiera: 
The accessibility features in iBooks will allow students to get support from the iPad via text-to-speech and also highlighting words they don't know.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:06 Jennie Magiera
5:06
Jennie Magiera: 
At this grade level, some of the content apps are actually quite useful. Some good examples are the TeachMe series (PK-2), SkoolBo and SmartyPantsSchool
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:06 Jennie Magiera
5:07
Jennie Magiera: 
Finally, don't forget that even our smallest tech users can be authors of their own digital content. In our Kindergarten classrooms, students are blogging, creating their own screencasts with Educreations and also creating iMovies and Keynotes. You'd be amazed to see how a 5 year old can create his own screencast, title it, save it and upload it as private to a website... often better than my 5th graders!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:07 Jennie Magiera
5:08
Jennie Magiera: 
For more info, check out Carrie Both's blog on kindergarten iPad use: ipadsink.blogspot.com
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:08 Jennie Magiera
5:08
Jennie Magiera: 
Also this post: http://teachinglikeits2999.blogspot.com/2012/10/anything-you-can-do-kindergarteners-can.html
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:08 Jennie Magiera
5:09
Francesca Duffy: 
Debbie actually has a similar question about using iPads with her older students (middle school):
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:09 Francesca Duffy
5:09
[Comment From DebbieDebbie: ] 
I'm most interested in using the ipads for middle school students. What types of activities/apps do you think are most successful for this age student. Thanks.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:09 Debbie
5:09
Jennie Magiera: 
At this level, I would tend to move away from content apps.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:09 Jennie Magiera
5:09
Jennie Magiera: 
I've found that often teachers get hung up on the "best math game app" or the "best phonics app". Truth be told, the most amazing fractions game, states facts quiz app or phonics app can only be stretched so far - perhaps one or two units (admittedly a bit longer for a good phonics app in primary).
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:09 Jennie Magiera
5:10
Jennie Magiera: 
However a good creation app... wow, those pay dividends. Consider a simple free app such as Educreations. This bad boy is a simple screen recording app, yet offers so much. Consider just a few of the endless uses in your classrooms: recording flipped classroom lessons, recording student metacognition, screencasting assessments, etc. Additionally, most creation apps can be used cross-content and cross-grade levels - making a better bang for your buck! (And the biggest draw -- for a happy trick of fate, more creation apps are FREE!)
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:10 Jennie Magiera
5:10
Jennie Magiera: 
Here are some of my Favorite Creation Apps. Also here is one I haven’t checked out, but is suggested by Greg Kulowiec: http://tactilize.com/video
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:10 Jennie Magiera
5:12
[Comment From EddieEddie: ] 
What is the most important thing when choosing an Ipad app to use with your class and students?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:12 Eddie
5:12
Jennie Magiera: 

Good question, Eddie. 

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:12 Jennie Magiera
5:12
Jennie Magiera: 
I think that after you first consider if it is worth it (what is the bang of the buck - as mentioned above... is it a creation app? Will I use it all year), then make sure it is student-friendly.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:12 Jennie Magiera
5:13
Jennie Magiera: 
I have had many experiences in my first year using iPads in the classroom in which I bought 32 app licenses for a specific app and then realized my kids hated it... for whatever myriad of reasons.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:13 Jennie Magiera
5:13
Jennie Magiera: 
So I started a student genius bar - they were the kids were were tech high flyers.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:13 Jennie Magiera
5:14
Jennie Magiera: 
I had these 6 kids vet apps before I bought licenses for all the kids. They would test them out, figure out if they liked them and how they thought we could use them in class.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:14 Jennie Magiera
5:14
Jennie Magiera: 
They would fill out this app review and let me know: http://www.msmagiera.com/student-app-review
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:14 Jennie Magiera
5:15
Jennie Magiera: 

Then, AFTER I had my kids' seal of approval, I would get the app and use it with my class. Those 6 kids switched hats from beta testers to group app tutorial leaders. So I didn't have to lock-step teach 32 kids how to use the app- they broke into 6 teams and were led on a hands-on exploration of the app by their own peers.

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:15 Jennie Magiera
5:15
Jennie Magiera: 
Needless to say, this worked so much better. Not only did I save myself running around like a fool trying to help 32 kids walk through an app, my students gained agency, ownership and self-efficacy.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:15 Jennie Magiera
5:16
Jennie Magiera: 
Finally I'd say the golden rule - after "always lean towards creation apps" - would be "less is more".
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:16 Jennie Magiera
5:17
Jennie Magiera: 
Don't try to get every cool new app on the market right away. Start off with 2 or 3 high leverage creation apps (or for you K/1 people - great, broad spanning content apps) and get your kids really comfy with them.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:17 Jennie Magiera
5:17
Jennie Magiera: 
By having too many apps, your kids' expertise is spread too thin -- the workflow becomes confusing and they become experts at nothing.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:17 Jennie Magiera
5:18
Francesca Duffy: 
And here's a question from Norma:
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:18 Francesca Duffy
5:18
[Comment From Norma CotoNorma Coto: ] 
I'm a writing teacher with computers and internet access for all of my students in the classroom. How can I use the iPad in a way that they will be glad they have it and not simply say, "What's the point? I can do all this on my computer."
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:18 Norma Coto
5:19
Jennie Magiera: 
Norma, what an awesome question! We should always be asking this!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:19 Jennie Magiera
5:20
Jennie Magiera: 
The biggest differences between a tablet and a computer are: portability/collaborative build and kinesthetic properties.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:20 Jennie Magiera
5:20
Jennie Magiera: 
In the first example, portability/collaborative build, consider how your students can take their writing on the road. How can students create narrative pieces in different settings? Just as some famous authors were inspired by sitting on Walden Pond, how can kids get into the city, the yard of the school, a hallway, etc to write? 
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:20 Jennie Magiera
5:21
Jennie Magiera: 
Additionally, how can the collaborative build of an iPad help the writing process? Wtih a laptop or desktop, the content is inherently private. Although you can elbow-to elbow write with a peer, a teacher facing a lab of students sees nothing but the backs of monitors. Consider: How can kids' writin on a tablet allow for more transparency in their writing process.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:21 Jennie Magiera
5:22
Jennie Magiera: 
Next, think of the kinesthetic properties. My cousin - a recent college grad - is an apsiring young adult fiction novelist. (Watch your back Stephanie Meyer!)
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:22 Jennie Magiera
5:22
Jennie Magiera: 
She recently sent me her first novel to read, edit and give feedback.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:22 Jennie Magiera
5:24
Jennie Magiera: 
I read the whole thing on my iPad because I could add in handwritten feedback, as well as highlight passages and even record audio feedback. I read a passage aloud, then did a think aloud on the way it felt as I read it. I used the app PaperPortNotes to do all of this and send her feedback. Of all the cousins, she found my feedback the most helpful because it was so organic for her to process - and because of the multimedia elements.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:24 Jennie Magiera
5:24
Jennie Magiera: 
So while the act of typing can be done on both a tablet and a computer - consider how the benefits of a tablet can help enhance or transform your writing process.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:24 Jennie Magiera
5:25
Jennie Magiera: 

(as a side note -- I do think that Google Docs on a computer is pretty transformative for the writing process... but alas iPads only support partial functionality through the Chrome app - in desktop mode - or the Drive app itself.)

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:25 Jennie Magiera
5:26
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
What are your best recommendations when it comes to professional development/ courses and how to learn about educational learning apps
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:26 Guest
5:26
Jennie Magiera: 
Another great question :).
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:26 Jennie Magiera
5:27
Jennie Magiera: 
First off, iTunes U is chock-full of great resources.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:27 Jennie Magiera
5:28
Jennie Magiera: 
Here is a collection of courses created by Apple Distinguished Educators to help colleagues on this: https://itunes.apple.com/us/institution/apple-distinguished-educators/id380379132
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:28 Jennie Magiera
5:28
Jennie Magiera: 
Next, YouTube! That's right, this site is more than Jimmy Kimmel clips and funny cat videos.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:28 Jennie Magiera
5:29
Jennie Magiera: 
Whenever I am working with a new app, website or program, the first thing I do is check out YouTube for screencasts created by fellow educators. More times than not, I find support.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:29 Jennie Magiera
5:29
Jennie Magiera: 
Next, check out Twitter hashtages. #ADEdu #iPadEd Etc are great ways to get bite-sized chunks of info regarding iPad use.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:29 Jennie Magiera
5:30
Jennie Magiera: 
And blogs / websites. It is great to see what colleagues are doing and with the advent of blogging (even though it's been around forever -- Doogie Howser!), we are seeing an upsurge in teachers sharing their craft.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:30 Jennie Magiera
5:30
Jennie Magiera: 
Here are a few of my favorites: 
Andy Brovey’s iPad Academy

Palm Beach, FL iPad Site

iPads in CPS Blog

Blogs to check out!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:30 Jennie Magiera
5:30
Jennie Magiera: 
and a few more: 

Ms. Laidler’s iPads in Science Blog

Ms. Mullenix-Stack’s iPads in Music Blog
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:30 Jennie Magiera
5:31
Jennie Magiera: 

For those in the Atlanta, GA area - there is an iPad Summit being hosted by EdTechTeacher on April 11-12th. I’ll be doing a Keynote on Friday with 3 colleagues from Chicago Public Schools - @MsLaidler , @AnitaOrozco2 and @HollyMullenixSt --- For more info & to register: http://ipadsummitusa.org/

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:31 Jennie Magiera
5:31
Francesca Duffy: 
Thanks Jennie! And here is a question from Carol on workflow. Jennie, do you have any advice for her?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:31 Francesca Duffy
5:32
[Comment From Carol SpeckCarol Speck: ] 
Hi Jennie, I have been following your blog for almost two years now and finally, the 25 iPad smart cart is in our building - okay not even close to one - to - one. So, with Common Core adopted in NJ, I find myself wanting to have the students show deep understanding rather than step by step procedures. We are using Decimals!!! as a practice tool and the kids are doing very well, loving the technology and I like the way it offers levels of difficulty to challenge them; but I want to track progress and "hear" their thinking. ShowMe seems like a good app, I know you had used it, but I cannot get to the iPad cart to "listen" to everyone right after math. Where does this app save the recordings? Can I save to the cloud without the kids having their own e-mail address? Do I just ask them to put their name on the "virtual" work? Our IT is asking me to figure this out but I'm teaching all day and working on the next week all night. Can you guide me to make this process more streamlined? I received an iPad for Christmas, so at least I have some access from home. Guidence is what I need. - Thank you!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:32 Carol Speck
5:32
Jennie Magiera: 
One of the biggest hurdles in using iPads in the classroom is workflow. The good news is that there are a lot of solutions coming out recently. Some examples are Showbie - a workflow app/website that allows for any apps using WebDAV or save to photo roll. However, my favorite is Schoology - a learning management system (LMS) that not only allows for assignment creation, workflow (turning in / grading / returning assignments) but also quizzes, moderated discussed (with teacher feedback options) and an online library or resources you can create yourself.  Edmodo is another similar option for those with younger kids or looking for varied options when choosing an LMS. Both are free at the teacher/school level.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:32 Jennie Magiera
5:32
Jennie Magiera: 
Specifically for workflow with Screencasting Apps: I would suggest moving from ShowMe to Doceri. Both are free, but Doceri allows you to save your video to the camera roll - thus allowing students to “turn in” that video via Showbie, Schoology or Edmodo.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:32 Jennie Magiera
5:33
[Comment From Judith PrinczJudith Princz: ] 
How will teachers and admin assess the efficacy of using iPads to teach?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:33 Judith Princz
5:33
Jennie Magiera: 
You don't need email addresses for any of these solutions.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:33 Jennie Magiera
5:33
Jennie Magiera: 
Ooh, Judith - that one is a hard question!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:33 Jennie Magiera
5:34
Jennie Magiera: 
We are always trying to assess the success of CPS' iPad initiative.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:34 Jennie Magiera
5:34
Jennie Magiera: 
However, as we all know, causation does not equal correlation.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:34 Jennie Magiera
5:35
Jennie Magiera: 
So we try and track as much data as possible. The great Margaret Murphy - the iPad Manager for CPS until recently - had us collect "6 buckets of happiness" - her cute term for 6 buckets of data. (As a math teacher, I agree that data = happiness.)
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:35 Jennie Magiera
5:36
Jennie Magiera: 
I believe they were: 
- Student anecdotals
- Testing data
- Attendance
- behavioral data
- Student work
- Teacher anecdotals
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:36 Jennie Magiera
5:37
Jennie Magiera: 
I could be wrong on one or two, but the point was to do our best to get a "whole picture view". Of course, having a real pilot with controls (i.e., looping kids with the same teacher - one year w/o iPads and the second with) is even better to see results.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:37 Jennie Magiera
5:38
Jennie Magiera: 
But the biggest thing we noticed was the self-efficacy/agency of students. They gained so much confidence in their own voices and ability to create. They blew the Bloom's Taxonomy scale away, becoming creators and analyzing on a higher level without hesitation. It was beautiful. It is beautiful.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:38 Jennie Magiera
5:39
Francesca Duffy: 
And here's a question from Alexander:
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:39 Francesca Duffy
5:39
[Comment From AlexanderAlexander: ] 
When schools can't fund iPads is it worth the investment for parents to make the purchase their student and view it as educational tool and not just another toy that's over priced?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:39 Alexander
5:40
Jennie Magiera: 
Yes! If used effectively, the iPad can definitely be a great tool for kids. In some schools with populations that access to more resources, administrators are piloting BYODs (bring your own devices) with great success.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:40 Jennie Magiera
5:41
Jennie Magiera: 
And even if you're a parent just looking to find a way to augment your child's learning, an iPad can be a great tool.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:41 Jennie Magiera
5:41
Jennie Magiera: 
For the latter, consider looking into Espark Learning - a great app/program that helps students by diagnosing their areas of needs, recommending apps to meet those needs and then tracking data to show growth.
http://esparklearning.com/
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:41 Jennie Magiera
5:42
[Comment From CaseousCaseous: ] 
Good morning. I think iPads have been quite useful but I've been struggling against a technology department that is confident that Windows & Android tablets are the way to go. I disagree with this but wonder what this community thinks. Any opinions on other tablets? Has anyone found them as useful as iPads?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:42 Caseous
5:43
Jennie Magiera: 

About a year ago, the Andriod tablet couldn't hold a candle to the iPad.

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:43 Jennie Magiera
5:43
Jennie Magiera: 
The biggest reason was the lack of accessibility features and the smaller selection in the Google Play store.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:43 Jennie Magiera
5:43
Jennie Magiera: 
However, now these tablets are starting to catch up - and even seem to be innovating at a quicker pace.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:43 Jennie Magiera
5:44
Jennie Magiera: 
For example, the Galaxy Note 10.1 allows for split screen in several of its apps -- allowing a child to browse the internet on one half of the screen while taking notes on the other.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:44 Jennie Magiera
5:44
Jennie Magiera: 
I have been praying to the tablet gods to make this happen for iOS devices such as the iPad. When iOS6 came out, this was not an option.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:44 Jennie Magiera
5:45
Jennie Magiera: 
However, Apple still has the market cornered in App Store availability for Education Apps and accessories to go with these tablets.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:45 Jennie Magiera
5:46
Jennie Magiera: 

Competition is a healthy thing - it forces companies to innovate. I have been saying lately - there is no such thing as long term relationships in EdTech... apps, websites and devices are always changing. I will always go for what's best for my students over brand loyalty. After all, it's all about the kids.

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:46 Jennie Magiera
5:47
[Comment From Daniel WeinrebDaniel Weinreb: ] 
what about Chrome books (199) as opposed to iPads.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:47 Daniel Weinreb
5:47
Jennie Magiera: 

Oooh! I was hoping someone would ask this!

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:47 Jennie Magiera
5:47
Jennie Magiera: 
In this case, once again consider the benefits of tablets vs computers and vice versa.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:47 Jennie Magiera
5:49
Jennie Magiera: 
iPads: 
Pros - kinesthetic, huge app library, portable, collaborative
Cons - no Flash, no keyboard, low Google Apps integration

Chromebooks:
Pros - Google Apps for Education!!! Keyboard, Flash, Cost ($279). no need to buy apps
Cons - not a lot of local storage, no Silverlight, no Java
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:49 Jennie Magiera
5:49
Jennie Magiera: 
The two biggest factors for me are the kinesthetic properties of iPads and the GAFE environment for Chromebooks.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:49 Jennie Magiera
5:49
Jennie Magiera: 
For a kindergartener, being about to collaborate on a Google doc in real time isn't a big win. Drawing on a touch screen and the intuitive nature of an iPad is.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:49 Jennie Magiera
5:50
Jennie Magiera: 
Conversely, for an 11th grader in AP European History, drawing letters on an iPad - not a big deal. Collaborating in real time on a presentation while in the midst of a Google hangout with kids from across the country - awesome.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:50 Jennie Magiera
5:51
Jennie Magiera: 
So we've been doing a developmental split for our schools. PK-5 = iPads; 6-12+ Humanities classes = Chromebooks, BUT 6-12 Math = iPads
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:51 Jennie Magiera
5:53
Francesca Duffy: 
Switching gears --Jennie, do you have any advice for Emily?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:53 Francesca Duffy
5:53
[Comment From EmilyEmily: ] 
I run an after-school program and we just bought 6 tablets to pilot with our kids. At this point, we are thinking of using them as supplements/time-fillers (example, once they finish their HW they can use the tablet for extended learning). But because it is not a formal classroom setting, most of the activities will have to be student directed (we don't have extra staff to be teaching new lessons on the tablets every day). Any suggestions about how to best utilize this new technology in this setting?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:53 Emily
5:53
Jennie Magiera: 

Yes - an LMS! 

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:53 Jennie Magiera
5:53
Jennie Magiera: 
Learning Management Systems are a great way to organize classrooms, increase student independence and make your own life easier - whether with 6 kids or 60.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:53 Jennie Magiera
5:54
Jennie Magiera: 
The two biggest competitors (free) out there are Edmodo and Schoology
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:54 Jennie Magiera
5:54
Jennie Magiera: 
Schoology
Schoolgy’s YouTube Channel

Edmodo
Edmodo’s YouTube Channel
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:54 Jennie Magiera
5:54
Jennie Magiera: 
Surprisingly enough, I have a ton to say on the matter of choosing between the two: Learning Management Systems: Edmodo vs. Schoology
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:54 Jennie Magiera
5:55
Jennie Magiera: 
And yet - as with everything else - once again there are no long term relationships in EdTech -- just as the weather in Chicago is unpredictable, so too is the edtech arena. We might wake up tomorrow and a third party takes the stage or one of those two might have a groundbreaking app update. It keeps you on your toes, for sure.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:55 Jennie Magiera
5:56
Jennie Magiera: 
Both are great ways to send your students tasks, activities, assignements, online content, files, or even have an interactive discussion in real time.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:56 Jennie Magiera
5:56
[Comment From RebeccaRebecca: ] 
What are the most innovative ways you're seeing teachers using iPads in classrooms recently?
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:56 Rebecca
5:57
Jennie Magiera: 

The 4Cs of 21st Century Learning - Collaboration, Creation, Critical thinking and Communication

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:57 Jennie Magiera
5:57
Jennie Magiera: 
Whenever I see teachers finding ways to break down the walls of their classroom - through Skype, FaceTime, GoogleHangouts - it's pretty inspiring.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:57 Jennie Magiera
5:58
Jennie Magiera: 
Last year we did a grant project where my 4th/5th graders wrote grants on how to make their schools a better place. We had the grant writer from CPS skype in and tell them about her job and grant writing.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:58 Jennie Magiera
5:59
Jennie Magiera: 

Also - kids creating their own digital content - writing blogs, creating iMovies, creating keynotes, etc... 

Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:59 Jennie Magiera
5:59
Jennie Magiera: 
Finally, when teachers rethink and redefine their classrooms using Dr. Puentedura's SAMR model - Dr. Puentedura’s SAMR Model
Tuesday January 8, 2013 5:59 Jennie Magiera
6:00
Jennie Magiera: 
Here's another post with more on that: http://teachinglikeits2999.blogspot.com/2011/07/reflecting-on-my-ipad-grant-thus-far.html
Tuesday January 8, 2013 6:00 Jennie Magiera
6:00
Francesca Duffy: 
And we are actually out of time. Thank you, Jennie, for your very thoughtful responses, and to everyone who participated in the chat!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 6:00 Francesca Duffy
6:01
Jennie Magiera: 
Thanks everyone! If you have more questions or would like to continue learning with me, I'm at @MsMagiera
Tuesday January 8, 2013 6:01 Jennie Magiera
6:01
Jennie Magiera: 
Sorry - twitter.com/msmagiera
Tuesday January 8, 2013 6:01 Jennie Magiera
6:02
Bryan Toporek: 
Thanks, Francesca and Jennie! That's a great place to wrap up.

Thanks to all of you who joined us today, and a special thanks to our excellent guest, Jennie, and moderator, Francesca.

We'll be posting the transcript of today's chat on the same page within the hour.
Tuesday January 8, 2013 6:02 Bryan Toporek
6:02
Bryan Toporek: 
Also, if you're not busy on Thursday at 4:30, we're having a free chat on How School Counselors Contribute to Student Success:
http://www.edweek.org/ew/events/chats/2013/01/10/index.html

Thanks again, folks, and have a great rest of the day!
Tuesday January 8, 2013 6:02 Bryan Toporek
6:02
 

 
 
 

Getting the Most Out of iPads in the Classroom

Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, 5 to 6 p.m. ET

A growing number of schools are purchasing iPads and other tablets for their classrooms, in hopes that they will bring greater connectivity and transform teaching and learning. But using iPads with students can pose challenges for even the most tech-savvy teacher, including issues related to workflow, syncing, support, and lesson planning. In this chat, a teacher and school tech coordinator will take your questions on the instructional use of digital tablets and provide tips on maximizing their impact on student learning. She will also discuss how iPads have changed her views on teaching and education in the 21st century.

Guest:
Jennie Magiera, an Apple Distinguished Educator, is the digital learning coordinator for the Academy of Urban School Leadership, a network of 25 Chicago public schools. She blogs at Teaching Like It's 2999.
Find her on Twitter @MsMagiera.

Francesca Duffy, Education Week Teacher intern, moderated this chat.

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