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Published in Print: September 1, 2003, as Grants

Grants

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Following are application deadlines for grants and fellowships available to individuals and schools. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

*September 15 LITERACY

The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation offers a number of $350 grants to U.S. public school teachers and librarians, and to librarians in public libraries, for programs that foster creativity and literacy in children. Application forms are available only from the Web site. Contact: Ezra Jack Keats Foundation, 450 14th St., Brooklyn, NY 11215-5702; www.ezra-jack- keats.org.

*September 30 CURRICULUM

The School, Home, and Office Products Association Foundation offers Kids in Need grants for teachers who have innovative classroom projects but lack the funding to bring them to life. Certified teachers in K-12 public, private, and parochial schools may apply. Grants of $100 to $500 are awarded for motivational projects and lesson plans. Applications are available at Jo-Ann Fabrics stores. Contact: Penny Hawk, Program Manager, SHOPA Foundation for Educational Excellence, 3131 Elbee Rd., Dayton, OH 45439; (800) 854-7467; e-mail pennyh@shopa.org; www.shopa.org.

*September 30 URBAN EDUCATION

The National Education Association is seeking proposals for innovative programs that relate to NEA's core priorities or use technology to promote networking in schools. Projects must contribute to the restoration of confidence in public education. Twenty-five $5,000 grants are awarded annually. All NEA local affiliates with 500 members or more, or a state's largest NEA affiliate with less than 500 members, are eligible to submit projects in their districts. Contact: NEA Urban Initiatives, 1201 16th St., Washington, DC 20036- 3207; (202) 822-7155; e- mailurbaned@nea.org; www.nea.org/grants/urban.

*October-February JAPANESE STUDIES

The Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, in conjunction with the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission, supports a variety of grant programs in Japanese studies designed to facilitate research, improve the quality of teaching about Japan, and integrate the study of Japan into major disciplines. Grants are available for instructional materials, seminars on teaching about Japan, and Japan-related speakers and panels. Contact: Northeast Asia Council Grants, Association for Asian Studies, 1021 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104; (734) 665-2490; fax (734) 665-3801; e-mail postmaster@aasianst.org; www.aasianst.org.

*October-February KOREAN STUDIES

The Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, in conjunction with the Korea Foundation, offers grants for instructional materials, workshops and conferences, projects that enhance Korean studies, and Korea-related speakers and panels. Contact: Northeast Asia Council Grants, Association for Asian Studies, 1021 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104; (734) 665-2490; fax (734) 665-3801; e-mail postmaster@aasianst.org; www.aasianst.org.

*October 1 ART

The National Art Education Foundation invites applications for its grant programs in four categories. Teacher Incentive grants award up to $1,000 to as many as 12 proposals that promote the teaching of art. The Mary McMullan Fund offers as many as 10 recipients up to $1,000 each for development of curriculum models and pilot projects. The National Art Education Association Research grants provide as much as $5,000 for proposed research, and the Ruth Halvorsen Professional Development Fund grants up to $1,000 for proposals focusing on the goals for student learning outlined in the association's national visual arts standards. Grants are available only to active NAEA members; the 2003 booklet can be downloaded from the Web site. Contact: Krista Jarrell, National Art Education Foundation, 1916 Association Dr., Reston, VA 20191-1590; (703) 860-8000; e- mail kjarrell@naea-reston.org; www.naea-reston.org.

*October 1 MATH AND SCIENCE

Toshiba America Foundation awards grants to K-6 teachers for projects to improve science and mathematics instruction in their schools. Projects should be inquiry-based and take place during the regular school day. Grants of up to $1,000 are available. An application form is required and may be downloaded from the Web site or requested as a hard copy. Contact: Toshiba America Foundation, (212) 596-0620; e-mail foundation@tai.toshiba.com; www.toshiba.com/taf.

*October 10 LIBRARIES

The American Library Association and Scholastic Library Publishing announce the annual Scholastic/Grolier National Library Week Grant. Open to all U.S. libraries, the $5,000 grant is awarded to a single institution for the best proposal for a public awareness campaign tied to National Library Week, April 18-24. All applications must include the "@ your library" brand and address ways to increase access to library services. Contact: Public Information Office, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545- 2433, ext. 4020; e-mail mhumphrey@ala.org; www.ala.org/@yourlibrary.

*October 15 TEACHER EXCHANGE

The Fulbright Teacher Exchange Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, provides opportunities for teachers and administrators at K-12 schools and two-year colleges to exchange positions with those in another country. U.S. citizens who are fluent in English and have a bachelor's degree and three years of full- time teaching experience are eligible. Contact: Fulbright Teacher Exchange Program, 600 Maryland Ave. S.W., Suite 320, Washington, DC 20024-2520; (800) 726-0479 or (202) 314-3527; e-mail fulbright@grad.usda.gov; www.fulbrightexchanges.org.

* October 24 ASTRONOMY

The Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS) grant program provides funding for startup innovative education or public outreach programs that feature collaborations between astronomers/space scientists and education and informal science professionals. Requests may be made for up to $50,000. The call for proposals is available on the Web site. Contact: Space Telescope Science Institute, (410) 338-4968; e-mail ideas@stsci.edu; http://ideas.stsci.edu.

*October 27 RESEARCH

The Spencer Foundation welcomes applications for the Dissertation Fellowship Program for education- related research. Approximately 30 nonrenewable fellowships of $20,000 each are awarded to support completion of dissertations. Applicants must be candidates for a doctoral degree in any field of study at a graduate school in the United States but need not be U.S. citizens. Topics must concern education, and all pre-dissertation requirements must have been completed by June 1, 2003. For more information, contact: Dissertation Fellowship Program, the Spencer Foundation, 875 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 3930, Chicago, IL 60611- 1803; (312) 337-7000; e-mail fellows@spencer.org; www.spencer.org.

*November BUSINESS

The Wall Street Journal and the Employment Management Association Foundation, which funds projects to enhance workforce quality, sponsor the EMAF School-Business Partnership Awards. This program encourages elementary and secondary schools to collaborate with businesses on employment issues such as workforce preparedness. It awards $5,000 each to as many as five school-business partnerships linking curriculum to the workplace. Contact: Wanda Flowers, Employment Management Association Foundation, 1800 Duke St., Alexandria, VA 22314-3499; (703) 535-6078; fax (703) 739-0399; e- mail wflowers@shrm.org; www.shrm.org/emaf.

*November 1 READING

The Regie Routman Teacher Recognition Award honors an outstanding K-6 classroom teacher of reading and language arts who is dedicated to improving teaching and learning through reflective writing about his or her teaching and learning process. All applicants for the $1,000 award must be members of the International Reading Association. Contact: Executive Office, International Reading Association, P.O. Box 8139, Newark, DE 19714-8139; (302) 731-1600, ext. 221; fax (302) 731-1057; e-mail exec@reading.org; www.reading.org.

*November 3 HUMANITIES

The National Endowment for the Humanities calls for proposals for two grants. Collaborative Research Grants support either original research by a team of two or more scholars, or research that is coordinated by an individual scholar but requires additional staffing. Scholarly Editions Grants fund the preparation of texts and documents that previously have been either inaccessible or available only in inadequate editions. Awards are made for one to three years and usually range from $25,000 to $100,000 a year. Sending applications to matching-grants programs is strongly encouraged. Contact: NEH, Office of Public Affairs, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20506; (202) 606-8446;e-mail info@neh.gov; www.neh.gov.

—By Lillian Hsu & Marianne Hurst

Vol. 15, Issue 1, Pages 55-56

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