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Published in Print: April 1, 2001, as Grants/Fellowships


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Following are application deadlines for grants and fellowships available to individuals and schools. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

Grants of up to $2,000 are available to K-12 teachers from the Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit group that fights discrimination. The grants are awarded for activities promoting diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Requests should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. The number of grants awarded depends on available funding. For more information, contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104; (334) 264-0286, ext. 374.

April-May OPERA
The Metropolitan Opera Guild seeks applicants for Creating Original Opera, a seven-day summer program to help some 100 elementary and middle school teachers use opera and musical theater in their classrooms. Tuition, room, board, and supplies are paid by the program, but there is a registration fee. Deadlines vary by region. For more information, contact: Metropolitan Opera Guild, Education at the Met, 70 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023; (212) 769- 7028;

The Center for Applied Linguistics seeks applicants for its G. Richard Tucker Fellowship. From June 2001 through May 2002, including a four-week residency at the center in Washington, D.C., the fellow works with senior CAL staff on one of the group’s ongoing research projects or on a suitable project suggested by the fellow. Priority is given to proposals that focus on language education and testing or on language issues related to minorities in the United States or Canada. The competition is open to master’s or doctoral candidates currently enrolled in a degree program in any field that is concerned with the study of language. Applicants must have completed the equivalent of at least one year of full-time graduate study. Minorities are especially encouraged to apply. The fellowship pays a $2,400 stipend plus travel expenses. For more information, contact: Grace Burkart, Center for Applied Linguistics, 4646 40th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20016; (202) 362-0700; e-mail

The National Endowment for the Humanities announces its 2002-2003 fellowships for individuals wanting to pursue advanced research in the humanities. Faculty and staff members of primary and secondary schools are eligible to apply for grants of $40,000, awarded for nine to 12 month fellowships, and $24,000, awarded for six to eight month fellowships. Contact: Fellowships, Division of Research Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Room 318, Washington, DC 20506; (202) 606-8200; e-mail; book/fellowships.html.

The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, an arm of the National Education Association, announces its Fine Arts Grants, which enable teachers to create and implement fine arts programs that target students at risk of failing school. Ten grants of $2,000 each are awarded to local NEA affiliates who administer the project. Local affiliates choose a teacher of art, music, theater, dance, design, media, or folk arts who is an NEA member to implement the grant. Grants must serve U.S. public middle or high school students. For more information, contact: NFIE, 1201 16th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3207; (202) 822-7840; e-mail;

The ASM International Foundation, a society of metals and materials scientists, awards 10 grants of $500 each to K-12 teachers. Applicants submit a two-page proposal describing curriculum-based, hands-on projects that enhance students’ awareness of the materials around them and involve observation, communication, and math and science skills. For more information, contact: ASM International Foundation, Living in a Material World Program, Materials Park, OH 44073-0002; (216) 433-3680; ation.

The Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation invites graphic communications teachers to submit grant proposals for education projects in the graphic-communications field. Typical programs aim to train teachers, guidance counselors, and other faculty and/or teach students about graphic arts technology as well as expose them to career opportunities within the industry. Proposals submitted by May 30 are considered for full funding; proposals for grants of up to $2,500 are accepted on a rolling basis. For more information, contact: Meredith Lamont, Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation, 1899 Preston White Dr., Reston, VA 20191-4367; (703) 264-7200; fax (703) 620-3165; e- mail

*June 15 JAPAN

The United States-Japan Foundation offers grants to improve U.S. K-12 instruction on Japan through teacher training, professional development, intensive study tours in Japan, and curriculum design. The foundation funds new or existing programs that include some of the following components: leadership development, information on U.S.-Japan relations and contemporary issues in both countries, training on using international issues in the classroom, and multimedia teaching tools. Grants last for one year but may be renewed by the foundation, which also supports the improvement of Japanese-language instruction through teacher training and curriculum development. Letters of inquiry must be received by June 15; full grant proposals are due July 31. For more information, contact: David Janes, Program Officer, Precollege Education Programs, United States-Japan Foundation, 145 E. 32nd St., 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016; (212) 481-8757; fax (212) 481-8762; e-mail;

 —Marisha Goldhamer

Vol. 12, Issue 7, Page 54

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