Published Online:
Published in Print: November 1, 1998, as Deadlines

Deadlines

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments


Following is a list of application deadlines for grants, fellowships, and honors available to individuals and schools. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS



Open. Aerospace.

The Aerospace Education Foundation offers grants of up to $250 to elementary and secondary classroom teachers to promote aerospace education. Two teachers per school may receive grants in a calendar year, and teachers may receive a grant every other year. For more information, contact: Kelly Kramer, Aerospace Education Foundation, 1501 Lee Hwy., Arlington, VA 22209-1198; (800) 727-3337, ext. 4880.

Open. Global Teaching.

Best Practices in Education, a nonprofit organization that aims to introduce U.S. schools to outstanding teaching practices from other countries, offers between four and eight Discovery Grants of up to $2,500 for American K-12 educators. Teachers or administrators who want to adopt subject matter or curricula from foreign schools are encouraged to apply. For more information, contact: Peter Moxhay, President, Best Practices in Education, 92 Exchange St., Portland, ME 04101; fax (207) 780-8731; e-mail info@bestpraceduc.org; www.bestpraceduc.org.

Open. Math.

MathSoft Inc., a developer of mathematical software and electronic books for desktop computers, offers a StudyWorks Innovative Teaching Grant for educators and schools who would like to use StudyWorks materials. Applicants must submit a proposal detailing how they would use StudyWorks in their classrooms. The winning schools receive 25 copies of StudyWorks and are featured on MathSoft's Web site. MathSoft also offers a Conference Presenter Grant Program, which provides stipends for educators attending conferences on math, science, or technology. Educators giving presentations or conducting workshops using MathSoft products are eligible to win $100 or $200 grants. For more information, contact: MathSoft Inc., 101 Main St., Cambridge, MA 02142; (617) 577-1017; fax (617) 577-8829; www.mathsoft.com.

Open. Math And Science.

Toshiba America Foundation grants support school-based projects that improve math and science education. The foundation chooses 70 recipients from middle and high schools with school-based, teacher-led projects. Small grants average less than $5,000; larger grants average $9,000. For more information, contact: Toshiba America Foundation, Program Office, 126 East 56th St., New York, NY 10022; (212) 588-0820; fax (212) 588-0824; e-mail foundation@tai.toshiba.com; www.toshiba.com.

Open. Teaching Tolerance.

Grants of up to $2,000 are available to K-12 teachers from the Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. The grants are awarded for activities promoting acceptance of diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Requests should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. Contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104.

November 2. Internet Connection.

The American Association of School Librarians, a division of the American Library Association, announces the ICPrize for Collaboration Through Technology. Teams of school library media specialists and classroom teachers can apply for $1,000 grants for travel to a state or national conference or for the purchase of technology. Applicants must be members of AASL/ALA. Up to five grants are awarded based on the creativity, clarity, and completeness of the proposal and on the effective use of Internet resources in development of a curriculum unit. Contact: ICONnect, American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4389; e-mail ICONnect@ala.org; www.ala.org/ ICONN/index.html.

December 5. Women's Sports.

The Women's Sports Foundation offers 100 Tampax Grants to middle and high school sports programs for girls ages 9-18. The $500 grants are designed to boost the quality of women's sports programs. For more information, contact: Tampax Grants for Girls Sports Program, Women's Sports Foundation, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow, NY 11554; (800) 227-3988.

*December 11. Education Research.

The National Academy of Education seeks applicants for the 1998-99 Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowships for teachers' research on improving education. Individuals who hold a doctorate or equivalent degree in behavioral or social sciences, the humanities, or education may apply. The degree must have been earned between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 1997. Applicants submit proposals for research that would make a significant contribution to education research and to the discipline from which it would draw. As many as 30 fellows are selected. Full-time fellows receive $45,000 for one year; part-time fellows receive $22,500 annually for two years. For more information, contact: National Academy of Education, School of Education, CERAS 108, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3084; (415) 725-1003.

*December 15. Laboratory Fellowship.

Fermilab announces its Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Teacher Fellowship. The fellow works at Fermilab in Batavia, Ill., for up to 12 months and develops curriculum material while researching particle physics. Graduate credit of up to nine semester hours is available, and the fellow receives a $550 stipend each week. Candidates must be full-time teachers of science or technology in grades 7-12 and must return to teaching for at least two years after the fellowship. For an application, contact: Fermilab Teacher Fellowship, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, MS 122, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510-0500. For more information, contact: Ron Ray, (630) 840-8090; email: rray@fnal.gov.

*January 5. Science Research.

The American Physiological Society encourages science teachers of grades 6-12 to apply for its Frontiers in Physiology Summer Research Program. As many as 20 teachers are selected to work in the laboratory of an APS researcher for seven to nine weeks. They receive a stipend of $500 per week for up to 9 weeks, plus $500 to attend a one-week retreat and $850 for travel expenses to the April 1999 APS annual meeting in San Diego. Contact: Phyllis Edelman, Project Coordinator, American Physiological Society, Frontiers in Physiology, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3991; (301) 571-0692; e-mail pedelman@aps.faseb.org.

*January 12. Math.

K-12 mathematics teachers are encouraged to apply for Toyota's Investment in Mathematics Excellence Grants. The program is sponsored in conjunction with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics; 35 grants of up to $10,000 each are awarded to develop innovative approaches to math instruction. Contact: Toyota's Investment in Mathematics Excellence, c/o National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, VA 20191-1593; (888) 573-8463; e-mail toyotatime@nctm.org.

*January 15. Gender Equity.

The American Association of University Women Educational Foundation awards Eleanor Roosevelt Teacher Fellowships to women teachers who have demonstrated a commitment to equity for girls in the classroom. Applicants must be full-time K-12 public school teachers in the United States; they must also have at least three consecutive years of experience teaching math, science, or technology and plan to continue teaching for three years after the fellowship. Awards range from $1,000 to $9,000 for proposals that address equality issues in education and techniques to boost girls' self-confidence and academic performance. Fellows also meet for a four-day Teacher Institute in Washington, D.C. Contact: American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, Dept. 174, 2201 N. Dodge St., Iowa City, IA 53343-4030; (319) 337-1716, ext. 174.

*January 15. Independent Schools.

The Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, offers various fellowships for staff at independent schools. Fifty fellowships at the Klingenstein Summer Institute are offered to independent secondary school teachers with two to five years of experience; fellows explore teaching styles, educational philosophies, and personal development. Heads of independent schools are eligible for one month of intensive study at Columbia as Visiting Fellows. Twelve Klingenstein Fellowships also are available to independent school teachers of grades 5-12 who have at least five years of experience; participants study educational and leadership development for either one semester or one year. All fellows receive a tuition stipend. Summer Institute teachers also receive housing, while Program Fellows get stipends and Visiting Fellows receive hotel accommodations. For more information, contact: Carollyn Finegold, Joseph Klingenstein Center, Box 125, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027; (212) 678-3156; e-mail crf17@columbia.edu; www.klingenstein.org.

*January 15. Math And Science Grants.

The Growth Initiative for Teachers Grant is awarded to 60 teacher teams to integrate their school's science and math curricula using technology. The teams must include one math teacher and one science teacher from the same school. Each team receives $7,000 to implement its plan, and each member receives $2,500 for professional development. The grants are sponsored by the GTE Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the publicly held telecommunications company. For more information, contact: GTE Foundation, (800) 315-5010; e-mail gift@gte.com.

*January 15. Science.

Toyota Motor Sales Inc., in conjunction with the National Science Teachers Association, offers 50 Tapestry Grants for K-12 science teachers to implement innovative student projects in environmental education or the physical sciences. Grant awards range up to $10,000; winners also receive an expenses-paid trip to the 1999 NSTA convention in Boston. Contact: Toyota Tapestry Grants, c/o National Science Teachers Association Award Programs, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201-3000; (800) 807-9852; e-mail tapestry@ nsta.org; www.nsta.org.

*February 1. Children's Literature.

The Children's Literature Association sponsors the Children's Literature Association Research Fellowships and Scholarships for association members. As many as four fellowships of between $250 and $1,000 are awarded for proposals of literary criticism or original scholarship that will eventually be published. Those interested in exploring fantasy or science fiction for youngsters are eligible for the Margaret P. Esmonde Memorial Scholarship. The number of scholarships awarded depends on the number of applicants. Contact: Scholarship Committee, Children's Literature Association, P.O. Box 138, Battle Creek, MI 49016-0138; email ebbs.english.vt.edu/chla.

*February 1. Girls' Achievement.

The American Association of University Women Educational Foundation sponsors Community Action Grants for women to pursue innovative programs and research projects that promote education and equity for women and girls. It offers 40 one-year grants of $2,000 to $7,000 for projects to create a clearly defined educational activity in any academic discipline. Five two-year grants of $5,000 to $10,000 are awarded to projects that focus on girls' achievement in K-12 math, science, and/or technology. For more information, contact: American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, Customer Service Center, 2201 N. Dodge St., Dept 148, Iowa City, IA 52243-4030; (319) 337-1716, ext. 148.

*February 1. Government.

The President's Commission on White House Fellowships offers up to 19 fellowships for professionals to participate in a one-year educational program in government and leadership. Fellows work as special assistants in Cabinet-level departments and earn a $71,000 salary. Teachers who are U.S. citizens are eligible. For more information, contact: Debrah Moody, President's Commission on White House Fellowships, 712 Jackson Pl. N.W., Washington, DC 20503; (202) 395-4522; fax (202) 395-6179; www.whitehouse.gov/WH_Fellows.

*February 1. Humanities.

The Council for Basic Education announces the Humanities Scholars Program, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Seventeen teams of four K-12 classroom teachers are selected for yearlong fellowships; teams work with a scholar of their choice. The four teachers receive $1,400 each, and the scholar is paid $1,500. Three of the four teachers must teach at least half their course load in the humanities. For more information, contact: Susannah Patton or Elsa Little, Council for Basic Education, 1319 F St. N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20004-1152; (202) 347-4171; fax (202) 347-5047; e-mail info@c-b-e.org; www.c-b-e.org.

*February 1. Library Research.

The American Association of School Librarians and the Highsmith Co. sponsor the 1999 AASL/Highsmith Research Grant. This grant supports model research on the impact of school library media programs on education. School library media specialists, library educators, and professors of library-information science or education are eligible for up to $2,500; if two or more researchers work jointly, as much as $5,000 may be awarded. For more information, contact: American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611-2795; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4384; e-mail AASL@ala.org; www.ala.org/aasl/awards.html.

*February 1. Library Scholarship.

The American Association of School Librarians and Information Plus offer the Information Plus Continuing Education Scholarship to a school library media specialist, supervisor, or educator. The $500 grant pays for an AASL member to attend an American Library Association or AASL regional workshop or a workshop run in conjunction with either group's annual conference. Applicants must be members of the AASL division of the ALA, full-time school library media specialists, or faculty members in a program educating school library media specialists. For more information, contact: Information Plus Scholarship, American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611-2795; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4384; www.ala.org/aasl/awards.html.

*February 15. Field Research.

The Earthwatch Teacher Fellowship offers educators opportunities to participate in two-week expeditions throughout the world during the summer of 1999. The program is sponsored by more than 40 corporations and administered by Earthwatch, a nonprofit group supporting scientific field research worldwide. Educators work side-by-side with expedition researchers; field research is multidisciplinary, so all full-time teachers are eligible. Counselors and administrators may also apply. Each fellow is eligible for funding to cover part or all of the expedition. For more information, contact: Matt Craig, Education Awards Manager, Earthwatch, 680 Mt. Auburn St., Box 9104, Watertown, MA 02272; (617) 926-8200, ext. 118; e-mail mcraig@earthwatch.org; www.earthwatch.org.

*February 15. Korean Studies.

The Korea Society announces fellowships for study in Korea. As many as 19 American educators will spend June 24-July 8, 1999, in Korea studying Korean history, economics, language, and other topics. K-12 social studies and language arts educators are eligible; administrators, supervisors, mentors, and social studies specialists with at least three years of experience are also eligible. For more information, contact: Yong Jin Choi, Director, Korean Studies Program, Korea Society, 950 Third Ave., 8th Floor, New York, NY 10022; (212) 759-7525; fax (212) 759-7530; e-mail korea.ny@koreasociety.org; www.koreasociety.org.

*February 26. Cable Television.

C-SPAN, the cable-television network covering the U.S. Congress, seeks applicants for its High School Teacher Fellowship Program. The selected fellow will work at C-SPAN in Washington, D.C., for four weeks next summer to develop high school print, video, and online materials for the network. The fellow receives a $3,000 stipend, $2,000 for housing costs, $500 in coupons for C-SPAN videos, a trip on the C-SPAN school bus, and round-trip airfare. For more information, contact: 1998 C-SPAN High School Teacher Fellowship Program, C-SPAN, c/o Education Relations, 400 North Capitol St. N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 523-7586.

*March 1. American History.

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation awards fellowships for graduate study on the U.S. Constitution. Outstanding secondary school teachers of American history, American government, and social studies are eligible, as are college seniors and graduate students planning teaching careers in those subjects. The foundation selects one fellow from each state to receive up to $24,000 to help pay for graduate study leading to a master's degree in history, political science, or education. Both full- and part-time fellowships are available. For more information, contact: James Madison Fellowship Program, P.O. Box 4030, Iowa City, IA 52243-4030; (800) 525-6928; e-mail Recogprog@act.org.

HONORS



*Open. Reading.

Random House Children's Publishing and First Book, a nonprofit organization dedicated to giving disadvantaged children the opportunity to read, have created the Reading Hero Awards to honor reading teachers, tutors, mentors, and volunteers. The award is given six times a year, beginning in September and running through March. Each winner receives $1,000 worth of Random House books and is the guest of honor at a Reading Hero luncheon. For more information, contact: First Book, 1319 F Street N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20004; (202) 393-1222; fax (202) 628-1258.

*December 1. School Spirit.

The second annual Motorola School Spirit Awards recognize schools that have taken innovative measures to increase school safety and efficiency. One primary school and one secondary school each receive twelve Motorola two-way radios and $1,000. Four honorable-mention schools win four two-way radios. Entries describe ways the school has increased safety and efficiency and how the school would use the radios toward these ends. For more information, contact: Motorola School Spirit Awards, c/o Hunter and Associates Inc., 41 Madison Ave., 5th Floor, New York, NY 10010; fax (212) 679-6607; www.motorola.com/spirit.

*December 5. Heroes In Education.

Reader's Digest is accepting nominations for its American Heroes in Education program, which honors K-12 teachers and principals whose outstanding achievements have affected the lives of students. Co-sponsors are the American Federation of Teachers, the National Association of Elementary School Principals, the National Association of Secondary School Principals, the National Education Association, and the National Catholic Education Association. Winners receive $5,000, plus $10,000 for their schools. Contact: Jan Brown, Director, American Heroes in Education Awards, Reader's Digest Association Inc., Reader's Digest Rd., Pleasantville, NY 10570-7000; (914) 244-2030.

*December 11. Science.

The Chemical Manufacturers Association offers the Catalyst Award to recognize outstanding science teachers. Elementary school science teachers and secondary school chemistry teachers are eligible to receive $2,500 awards. For more information, contact: Hope Bonito, Chemical Manufacturers Association, 1300 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22209; (703) 741-5826; fax (703) 741-6095.

*January 2. Hall Of Fame.

The National Teachers Hall of Fame is accepting nominations for its 1999 induction. Active or retired certified preK-12 teachers with at least 20 years of classroom experience are eligible. Five teachers are selected to be represented in the Hall of Fame Gallery and receive an expenses-paid trip to the June induction ceremony. For more information, contact: National Teachers Hall of Fame, 1320 C of E Dr., Emporia, KS 66801; (800) 968-3224.

*January 15. Gifted Children.

The National Association for Gifted Children announces the Hollingworth Award Competition, designed to encourage educational and psychological studies that could benefit gifted and talented students. Educators, organizations, and institutions are eligible to submit proposals. The winner receives $2,000 to support the research. For more information, contact: Sandra Kaplan, Hollingworth Award Committee, National Association for Gifted Children, 1707 L St. N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20036; (202) 785-4268.

*January 16. Teacher Of The Year.

The American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, GLENCOE/McGraw-Hill publishers, and the Teacher of the Year Award Endowment Fund sponsor the Teacher of the Year Award. Candidates must be full-time K-12 teachers of family and consumer sciences and have been members of the AAFCS for the past three years. The winner receives $1,000, plus up to $500 to cover transportation costs to the AAFCS annual meeting in Seattle in June. For more information, contact: American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, 1555 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314-2752; (703) 706-4600.

*January 31. Art And Environment.

The Weather Channel and the Polaroid Education Program are sponsoring the Look Up! Challenge Sky Contest. Teachers may enter the contest by submitting a photograph of a sky-awareness bulletin board along with an essay describing its creation and use. The first- place teacher winner receives a television monitor and VCR, curriculum resources, and a Polaroid Photo- Max scanner for the classroom. For more information, call (800) 471-5544; www.weather.com/ education.

*February 1. Biology.

Prentice Hall, in conjunction with the National Association of Biology Teachers, invites biology teachers of grades 7-12 to apply for its Outstanding Biology Teacher Award. Candidates must have at least three years of experience teaching in public or private schools. Teachers can nominate themselves or their colleagues. For more information, contact: Louise Pittack, Awards Manager, National Association of Biology Teachers, 11250 Roger Bacon Dr., #19, Reston, VA 20190-5202; (703) 471-1134 or (800) 406-0775; e-mail nabter@aol.com; www.nabt.org.

*February 1. Library Administration.

The American Association of School Librarians and SIRS Inc. offer the $2,000 Distinguished School Administrator's Award to a school administrator who has developed an exemplary school library media program and improved the library media center as an educational facility. Candidates must be nominated by AASL members. For more information, contact: AASL/SIRS Distinguished School Administrator's Award, American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611-2795; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4384; www.ala. org/aasl/awards.html.

*February 1. Library Media.

The American Association of School Librarians and the R.R. Bowker Co. offer the Frances Henne Award to pay travel expenses for a school library media specialist to attend the 1999 American Library Association conference in New Orleans. Applicants must have between one and five years of experience and be members of the AASL division of the ALA; they must also have never attended an ALA annual conference or an AASL national conference. For more information, contact: Frances Henne Award, American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611-2795; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4384; www.ala. org/aasl/awards.html.

*February 28. Web Pages.

Advanced Network and Services Inc., a nonprofit organization that promotes technology in education, sponsors ThinkQuest for Tomorrow's Teachers, an international contest that challenges teachers of grades K-12 to build educational Web sites that are interactive teaching and learning tools. Winners and their schools receive cash awards. For more information, contact: Advanced Network and Services Inc.; www.thinkquest.org.

*March 1. Arts Education.

The National Association of Schools of Art and Design, the National Association of Schools of Dance, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the National Association of Schools of Theater sponsor the $1,000 Reston Prize. Applicants submit an in-depth policy analysis of 3,000-3,500 words describing the relationship between K-12 arts education and higher education; papers must not have been published previously. The winner's paper is published in the November/December issue of Arts Education Policy Review. For more information, contact: Arts Education Policy Review Competitions, Reston Prize, Heldref Publications, 1319 18th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1802; (202) 296-6267; fax (202) 296-5149.

*March 1. Education Leaders.

The McGraw-Hill Companies seek nominations for the 1998 Harold W. McGraw Jr. Prize in Education. Up to three prizes of $25,000 each are awarded to individuals who have made a demonstrated difference in American education. Applications will be available in January. For more information, contact: Teresa White, Harold W. McGraw Jr. Prize in Education, 1221 Avenue of the Americas, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10020; (212) 512-6113; info@bestpraceduc.org; www.bestpraceduc.org.

Open. Math.

MathSoft Inc., a developer of mathematical software and electronic books for desktop computers, offers a StudyWorks Innovative Teaching Grant for educators and schools who would like to use StudyWorks materials. Applicants must submit a proposal detailing how they would use StudyWorks in their classrooms. The winning schools receive 25 copies of StudyWorks and are featured on MathSoft's Web site. MathSoft also offers a Conference Presenter Grant Program, which provides stipends for educators attending conferences on math, science, or technology. Educators giving presentations or conducting workshops using MathSoft products are eligible to win $100 or $200 grants. For more information, contact: MathSoft Inc., 101 Main St., Cambridge, MA 02142; (617) 577-1017; fax (617) 577-8829; www.mathsoft.com.

Open. Math And Science.

Toshiba America Foundation grants support school-based projects that improve math and science education. The foundation chooses 70 recipients from middle and high schools with school-based, teacher-led projects. Small grants average less than $5,000; larger grants average $9,000. For more information, contact: Toshiba America Foundation, Program Office, 126 East 56th St., New York, NY 10022; (212) 588-0820; fax (212) 588-0824; e-mail foundation@tai.toshiba.com; www.toshiba.com.

Open. Teaching Tolerance.

Grants of up to $2,000 are available to K-12 teachers from the Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. The grants are awarded for activities promoting acceptance of diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Requests should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. Contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104.

November 2. Internet Connection.

The American Association of School Librarians, a division of the American Library Association, announces the ICPrize for Collaboration Through Technology. Teams of school library media specialists and classroom teachers can apply for $1,000 grants for travel to a state or national conference or for the purchase of technology. Applicants must be members of AASL/ALA. Up to five grants are awarded based on the creativity, clarity, and completeness of the proposal and on the effective use of Internet resources in development of a curriculum unit. Contact: ICONnect, American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4389; e-mail ICONnect@ala.org; www.ala.org/ ICONN/index.html.

December 5. Women's Sports.

The Women's Sports Foundation offers 100 Tampax Grants to middle and high school sports programs for girls ages 9-18. The $500 grants are designed to boost the quality of women's sports programs. For more information, contact: Tampax Grants for Girls Sports Program, Women's Sports Foundation, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow, NY 11554; (800) 227-3988.

*December 11. Education Research.

The National Academy of Education seeks applicants for the 1998-99 Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowships for teachers' research on improving education. Individuals who hold a doctorate or equivalent degree in behavioral or social sciences, the humanities, or education may apply. The degree must have been earned between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 1997. Applicants submit proposals for research that would make a significant contribution to education research and to the discipline from which it would draw. As many as 30 fellows are selected. Full-time fellows receive $45,000 for one year; part-time fellows receive $22,500 annually for two years. For more information, contact: National Academy of Education, School of Education, CERAS 108, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3084; (415) 725-1003.

*December 15. Laboratory Fellowship.

Fermilab announces its Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Teacher Fellowship. The fellow works at Fermilab in Batavia, Ill., for up to 12 months and develops curriculum material while researching particle physics. Graduate credit of up to nine semester hours is available, and the fellow receives a $550 stipend each week. Candidates must be full-time teachers of science or technology in grades 7-12 and must return to teaching for at least two years after the fellowship. For an application, contact: Fermilab Teacher Fellowship, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, MS 122, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510-0500. For more information, contact: Ron Ray, (630) 840-8090; email rray@fnal.gov.

*January 5. Science Research.

The American Physiological Society encourages science teachers of grades 6-12 to apply for its Frontiers in Physiology Summer Research Program. As many as 20 teachers are selected to work in the laboratory of an APS researcher for seven to nine weeks. They receive a stipend of $500 per week for up to 9 weeks, plus $500 to attend a one-week retreat and $850 for travel expenses to the April 1999 APS annual meeting in San Diego. Contact: Phyllis Edelman, Project Coordinator, American Physiological Society, Frontiers in Physiology, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3991; (301) 571-0692; e-mail pedelman@aps.faseb.org.

*January 12. Math.

K-12 mathematics teachers are encouraged to apply for Toyota's Investment in Mathematics Excellence Grants. The program is sponsored in conjunction with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics; 35 grants of up to $10,000 each are awarded to develop innovative approaches to math instruction. Contact: Toyota's Investment in Mathematics Excellence, c/o National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, VA 20191-1593; (888) 573-8463; e-mail toyotatime@nctm.org.

*January 15. Gender Equity.

The American Association of University Women Educational Foundation awards Eleanor Roosevelt Teacher Fellowships to women teachers who have demonstrated a commitment to equity for girls in the classroom. Applicants must be full-time K-12 public school teachers in the United States; they must also have at least three consecutive years of experience teaching math, science, or technology and plan to continue teaching for three years after the fellowship. Awards range from $1,000 to $9,000 for proposals that address equality issues in education and techniques to boost girls' self-confidence and academic performance. Fellows also meet for a four-day Teacher Institute in Washington, D.C. Contact: American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, Dept. 174, 2201 N. Dodge St., Iowa City, IA 53343-4030; (319) 337-1716, ext. 174.

*January 15. Independent Schools.

The Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, offers various fellowships for staff at independent schools. Fifty fellowships at the Klingenstein Summer Institute are offered to independent secondary school teachers with two to five years of experience; fellows explore teaching styles, educational philosophies, and personal development. Heads of independent schools are eligible for one month of intensive study at Columbia as Visiting Fellows. Twelve Klingenstein Fellowships also are available to independent school teachers of grades 5-12 who have at least five years of experience; participants study educational and leadership development for either one semester or one year. All fellows receive a tuition stipend. Summer Institute teachers also receive housing, while Program Fellows get stipends and Visiting Fellows receive hotel accommodations. For more information, contact: Carollyn Finegold, Joseph Klingenstein Center, Box 125, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027; (212) 678-3156; e-mail crf17@columbia.edu; www.klingenstein.org.

*January 15. Math And Science Grants.

The Growth Initiative for Teachers Grant is awarded to 60 teacher teams to integrate their school's science and math curricula using technology. The teams must include one math teacher and one science teacher from the same school. Each team receives $7,000 to implement its plan, and each member receives $2,500 for professional development. The grants are sponsored by the GTE Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the publicly held telecommunications company. For more information, contact: GTE Foundation, (800) 315-5010; e-mail gift@gte.com.

*January 15. Science.

Toyota Motor Sales Inc., in conjunction with the National Science Teachers Association, offers 50 Tapestry Grants for K-12 science teachers to implement innovative student projects in environmental education or the physical sciences. Grant awards range up to $10,000; winners also receive an expenses-paid trip to the 1999 NSTA convention in Boston. Contact: Toyota Tapestry Grants, c/o National Science Teachers Association Award Programs, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201-3000; (800) 807-9852; e-mail tapestry@nsta.org; www.nsta.org.

*February 1. Children's Literature.

The Children's Literature Association sponsors the Children's Literature Association Research Fellowships and Scholarships for association members. As many as four fellowships of between $250 and $1,000 are awarded for proposals of literary criticism or original scholarship that will eventually be published. Those interested in exploring fantasy or science fiction for youngsters are eligible for the Margaret P. Esmonde Memorial Scholarship. The number of scholarships awarded depends on the number of applicants. Contact: Scholarship Committee, Children's Literature Association, P.O. Box 138, Battle Creek, MI 49016-0138; email ebbs.english.vt.edu/chla.

*February 1. Girls' Achievement.

The American Association of University Women Educational Foundation sponsors Community Action Grants for women to pursue innovative programs and research projects that promote education and equity for women and girls. It offers 40 one-year grants of $2,000 to $7,000 for projects to create a clearly defined educational activity in any academic discipline. Five two-year grants of $5,000 to $10,000 are awarded to projects that focus on girls' achievement in K-12 math, science, and/or technology. For more information, contact: American Association of University Women Educational Foundation, Customer Service Center, 2201 N. Dodge St., Dept 148, Iowa City, IA 52243-4030; (319) 337-1716, ext. 148.

*February 1. Government.

The President's Commission on White House Fellowships offers up to 19 fellowships for professionals to participate in a one-year educational program in government and leadership. Fellows work as special assistants in Cabinet-level departments and earn a $71,000 salary. Teachers who are U.S. citizens are eligible. For more information, contact: Debrah Moody, President's Commission on White House Fellowships, 712 Jackson Pl. N.W., Washington, DC 20503; (202) 395-4522; fax (202) 395-6179; www.whitehouse.gov/WH_Fellows.

*February 1. Humanities.

The Council for Basic Education announces the Humanities Scholars Program, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Seventeen teams of four K-12 classroom teachers are selected for yearlong fellowships; teams work with a scholar of their choice. The four teachers receive $1,400 each, and the scholar is paid $1,500. Three of the four teachers must teach at least half their course load in the humanities. For more information, contact: Susannah Patton or Elsa Little, Council for Basic Education, 1319 F St. N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20004-1152; (202) 347-4171; fax (202) 347-5047; e-mail info@c-b-e.org; www.c-b-e.org.

*February 1. Library Research.

The American Association of School Librarians and the Highsmith Co. sponsor the 1999 AASL/Highsmith Research Grant. This grant supports model research on the impact of school library media programs on education. School library media specialists, library educators, and professors of library-information science or education are eligible for up to $2,500; if two or more researchers work jointly, as much as $5,000 may be awarded. For more information, contact: American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611-2795; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4384; e-mail AASL@ala.org; www.ala.org/aasl/awards.html.

*February 1. Library Scholarship.

The American Association of School Librarians and Information Plus offer the Information Plus Continuing Education Scholarship to a school library media specialist, supervisor, or educator. The $500 grant pays for an AASL member to attend an American Library Association or AASL regional workshop or a workshop run in conjunction with either group's annual conference. Applicants must be members of the AASL division of the ALA, full-time school library media specialists, or faculty members in a program educating school library media specialists. For more information, contact: Information Plus Scholarship, American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611-2795; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4384; www.ala.org/aasl/awards.html.

*February 15. Field Research.

The Earthwatch Teacher Fellowship offers educators opportunities to participate in two-week expeditions throughout the world during the summer of 1999. The program is sponsored by more than 40 corporations and administered by Earthwatch, a nonprofit group supporting scientific field research worldwide. Educators work side-by-side with expedition researchers; field research is multidisciplinary, so all full-time teachers are eligible. Counselors and administrators may also apply. Each fellow is eligible for funding to cover part or all of the expedition. For more information, contact: Matt Craig, Education Awards Manager, Earthwatch, 680 Mt. Auburn St., Box 9104, Watertown, MA 02272; (617) 926-8200, ext. 118; e-mail mcraig@earthwatch.org; www.earthwatch.org.

*February 15. Korean Studies.

The Korea Society announces fellowships for study in Korea. As many as 19 American educators will spend June 24-July 8, 1999, in Korea studying Korean history, economics, language, and other topics. K-12 social studies and language arts educators are eligible; administrators, supervisors, mentors, and social studies specialists with at least three years of experience are also eligible. For more information, contact: Yong Jin Choi, Director, Korean Studies Program, Korea Society, 950 Third Ave., 8th Floor, New York, NY 10022; (212) 759-7525; fax (212) 759-7530; e-mail korea.ny@koreasociety.org; www.koreasociety.org.

*February 26. Cable Television.

C-SPAN, the cable-television network covering the U.S. Congress, seeks applicants for its High School Teacher Fellowship Program. The selected fellow will work at C-SPAN in Washington, D.C., for four weeks next summer to develop high school print, video, and online materials for the network. The fellow receives a $3,000 stipend, $2,000 for housing costs, $500 in coupons for C-SPAN videos, a trip on the C-SPAN school bus, and round-trip airfare. For more information, contact: 1998 C-SPAN High School Teacher Fellowship Program, C-SPAN, c/o Education Relations, 400 North Capitol St. N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 523-7586.

*March 1. American History.

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation awards fellowships for graduate study on the U.S. Constitution. Outstanding secondary school teachers of American history, American government, and social studies are eligible, as are college seniors and graduate students planning teaching careers in those subjects. The foundation selects one fellow from each state to receive up to $24,000 to help pay for graduate study leading to a master's degree in history, political science, or education. Both full- and part-time fellowships are available. For more information, contact: James Madison Fellowship Program, P.O. Box 4030, Iowa City, IA 52243-4030; (800) 525-6928; e-mail Recogprog@act.org.

Vol. 10, Issue 3, Pages 59-61

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented

MORE EDUCATION JOBS >>