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Published in Print: October 1, 1998, as DEADLINES

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Following is a list of application deadlines for grants, fellowships, and honors available to individuals and schools. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

*Open. Aerospace.
The Aerospace Education Foundation offers grants of up to $250 to elementary and secondary classroom teachers to promote aerospace education. Two teachers per school may receive grants in a calendar year, and teachers may receive a grant every other year. For more information, contact: Kelly Kramer, Aerospace Education Foundation, 1501 Lee Hwy., Arlington, VA 22209-1198; (800) 727-3337, ext. 4880.

*Open. Global Teaching.
Best Practices in Education, a nonprofit organization that aims to introduce U.S. schools to outstanding teaching practices from other countries, offers between four and eight Discovery Grants of up to $2,500 for American K-12 educators. Teachers or administrators who want to adopt subject matter or curriculum from foreign schools are encouraged to apply. For more information, contact: Peter Moxhay, President, Best Practices in Education, 92 Exchange St., Portland, ME 04101; fax (207) 780-8731; e-mail: info@bestpraceduc.org; www.bestpraceduc.org.

*Open. Math.
MathSoft Inc., a developer of mathematical software and electronic books for desktop computers, offers a StudyWorks Innovative Teaching Grant for educators and schools who would like to use StudyWorks materials. Applicants must submit a proposal detailing how they would use StudyWorks in their classrooms. The winning schools receive 25 copies of StudyWorks and are featured on MathSoft's Web site. MathSoft also offers a Conference Presenter Grant Program, which provides stipends for educators attending conferences on math, science, or technology. Educators giving presentations or conducting workshops using MathSoft products are eligible to win $100 or $200 grants. For more information, contact: MathSoft Inc., 101 Main St., Cambridge, MA 02142; (617) 577-1017; fax (617) 577-8829; www.mathsoft.com.

*Open. Math And Science.
Toshiba America Foundation grants support school-based projects that improve math and science education. The foundation chooses 70 recipients from middle and high schools with school-based, teacher-led projects. Small grants average lessthan $5,000; larger grants average $9,000. For more information, contact: Program Office, 126 East 56th St., New York, NY 10022; (212) 588-0820; fax (212) 588-0824; e-mail: foundation@tai.toshiba.com; www.toshiba.com.

*Open. Teaching Tolerance.
Grants of up to $2,000 are available to K-12 teachers from the Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. The grants are awarded for activities promoting acceptance of diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Requests should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. Contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104.

September 30. UPS Foundation.
The UPS Foundation seeks applicants for its grant programs. Funding is intended for national organizations that directly support K-12 education. Program areas include family-learning opportunities and school-involvement projects. Grant proposals and financial statements should be no more than two pages and can be sent to UPS Foundation, Attn: Executive Director, 55 Glenlake Pkwy. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30328; (404) 828-6374.

October 1. Art.
The foundation of the National Art Education Association invites applications for its grant programs. The Teacher Incentive Program awards up to $1,000 for proposals to promote art teaching. The Mary McMullan Fund awards up to $1,000 for development of curriculum models and pilot projects to promote arts education. The NAEA Research Fund awards up to $3,000 for proposed research in arts education. And the Ruth Halvorsen Professional Development Fund awards up to $1,000 for proposals focusing on the goals for student learning outlined in the NAEA's visual-arts standards. Grants are available only to NAEA members with one year's standing; applicants submit proposals of five or fewer pages and a written statement describing anticipated benefits of the proposal. For more information, contact: Donnamarie Gilbert, National Art Education Foundation, 1916 Association Dr., Reston, VA 20191-1590; (703) 860-8000.

October 1. Japanese Studies.
The Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, in conjunction with the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission, supports a variety of grant programs in Japanese studies. The programs are designed to facilitate the research of individual scholars, improve the quality of teaching about Japan, and integrate the study of Japan into the majordisciplines. Grants are available for seminars on teaching about Japan, instructional materials, and Japan-related speakers and panels at national conventions of major disciplines. For more information, contact: Northeast Asia Council Grants, Association for Asian Studies, 1 Lane Hall, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1290; (313) 665-2490; fax (313) 665-3801; e-mail: postmaster@aasianst.org.

October 1. Korean Studies.
The Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, in conjunction with the Korea Foundation, offers grants for workshops, conferences, and projects that enhance Korean studies, instructional materials, and Korea-related speakers and panels. For more information, contact: Northeast Asia Council Grants, Association for Asian Studies, 1 Lane Hall, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1290; (313) 665-2490; fax (313) 665-3801; e-mail: postmaster@aasianst.org.

October 15. Humanities.
The National Endowment for the Humanities seeks grant proposals for three types of projects: those that disseminate exemplary humanities programs, further the development of new classroom materials such as CD-ROMs, and support humanities studies and the development of model courses and curriculum. Groups of eight to 16 teachers are eligible to receive as much as $250,000 for up to three years. Contact: Division of Research and Education Programs, Room 318, National Endowment for the Humanities, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20506; (202) 606-8380; e-mail: education@neh.gov; www.neh.gov.

October 15. Leadership.
The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education has up to 50 grants available to public school teachers and support staff nationwide through its Leadership Grants Program. The grants are designed to help educators improve their skills and provide leadership in their schools or institutions. Awardees will be given up to $1,000 a year for professional-development activities focusing on the needs of students. Leadership grants must be in compliance with the recommendations described in the NFIE's report, Teachers Take Charge of Their Learning: Transforming Professional Development for Student Success, which is available on the foundation's Web site. For more information, contact: Anna Smith, Leadership Grants, 1201 16th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3207; (202) 822-7840; www.nfie.org.

October 15. National Library Week.
The American Library Association announces its Grolier National Library Week Grant. The applicant with the best proposal for a public-awareness campaign tied to the National Library Week theme, "Read! Learn! Connect! at the Library," receives $4,000 to start the campaign. Contact: Public Information Office, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 5044; e-mail: pio@ala.org; www.ala.org/events/promoevents/nlw--98/grolierapp.html.

October 15. Reading Research.
The International Reading Association offers various grants and fellowships. The Jeanne S. Chall Research Fellowship is a $6,000 grant to support research in beginning reading, readability, reading difficulty, stages of reading development, the relation of vocabulary to reading, and diagnosing and teaching adults with limited reading ability. The Teacher as Researcher Grant program supports teachers in their inquiries about literacy and instruction; grants of up to $5,000 will be awarded, although priority will be given to smaller requests of $1,000 to $2,000. Elva Knight Research Grants of up to $5,000 each will be awarded to IRA members for proposed research that addresses new and significant questions in literacy and reading. The Nila Banton Smith Research Dissemination Support Grant provides an IRA member with up to $5,000 for a research-dissemination activity of two to 10 months. For more information, contact: Gail Keating, Division of Research, International Reading Association, 800 Barksdale Rd., P.O. Box 8139, Newark, DE 19714-8139; (302) 731-1600, ext. 226; fax (302) 731-1057; e-mail: gkeating@reading.org; www.reading.org.

October 15. Teacher Exchange.
The Fulbright Teacher Exchange Program, sponsored by the United States Information Agency, provides opportunities for teachers and administrators at K-12 schools and faculty members at two-year colleges to exchange positions with teachers from another country. U.S. citizens who are fluent in English and who have at least a bachelor's degree and at least three years of full-time teaching experience are eligible. Participating countries are Argentina, Benin, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Senegal, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. For more information, contact: Fulbright Teacher Exchange Program, 600 Maryland Ave. S.W., Suite 320, Washington, DC 20024-2520; (800) 726-0479 or (202) 314-3527; e-mail: fulbright@grad.usda.gov.

October 23. Study Abroad.
The United States Information Agency, the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, and the Institute of International Education are seeking applications for the 1999 Fulbright Grants for Graduate Study or Research Abroad. All applicants must be U.S. citizens and should hold a bachelor's degree or its equivalent; creative and performing artists need four years of relevant training or study. The grants provide travel, maintenance for the duration of the grant, a research allowance, and tuition waivers, if applicable. Contact: Walter Jackson, U.S. Student Programs Division, Institute of International Education; (212) 984-5330.

*November 2. Internet Connection.
The American Association of School Librarians, a division of the American Library Association, announces the ICPrize for Collaboration Through Technology. Teams of school library media specialists and classroom teachers can apply for $1,000 grants for travel to a state or national conference or for the purchase of technology. Applicants must be members of AASL/ALA. Up to five grants are awarded based on the creativity, clarity, and completeness of the proposal and on the effective use of Internet resources in development of a curriculum unit. Contact: ICONnect, American Association of School Librarians, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4389; e-mail: ICONnect@ala.org; www.ala.org/ICONN/index.html.

November 15. Women's Studies.
The American Association of University Women has grant programs for female graduate students. Scholars completing dissertations or seeking funds for postdoctoral work are eligible for the American Fellowship, a $27,000 award given to an outstanding candidate whose work or research is helping women and girls. Fourteen Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships provide one year of support for female doctorates in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Dissertation Fellowships of $15,000 are awarded to women in their final year of a doctoral program; special consideration is given to scholars writing about gender issues. Six Publication Grants of $5,250 help women preparing their research for publication. For more information, contact: AAUW Educational Foundation, Customer Service Center, 2201 N. Dodge St., Dept. 148, Iowa City, IA 52243-4030; (319) 337-1716, ext. 148.

December 1. Library Conferences.
The Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association, seeks applicants for its Baker and Taylor/YALSA Conference Grants. Two librarians who work directly with young adults in either a public or school library receive grants of $1,000 each to attend the 1999 American Library Association annual conference in New Orleans. Applicants must be YALSA members who have from one to 10 years of experience working with teenagers and who have never attended the annual ALA conference. Contact: Baker and Taylor/YALSA Conference Grants, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4390; fax (312) 664-7459; e-mail: yalsa@ala.org; www.ala.org/yalsa.

December 1. Library Grants.
The Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association, seeks applicants for its Book Wholesalers Inc./YALSA Collection Development Grants. YALSA members working with students ages 12-18 in a public library are eligible to win one of two $1,000 grants for additional library resources. For more information, contact: BWI/YALSA Collection Development Grant, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4390; fax (312) 664-7459; e-mail: yalsa@ala.org; www.ala.org/yalsa.

December 1. Library Research.
The Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association, offers the Frances Henne/YALSA/Voice of Youth Advocates Research Grant. The $500 grant is seed money for small-scale projects that promote research relating to library services for young adults. Only members of YALSA are eligible. For more information, contact: Henne/YALSA/VOYA Research Grant, YALSA Office, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611; (800) 545-2433, ext. 4390; fax (312) 664-7459; e-mail: yalsa@ala.org; www.ala.org.

December 1. Math Meeting.
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics seeks applicants for the Future Leaders Annual Meeting Support Project. The project pays up to $1,000 in travel expenses and substitute teacher costs to help full-time K-12 math teachers attend the NCTM annual meeting. NCTM members who have never attended the meeting and who have three to 10 years of teaching experience are eligible. For more information, contact: Mathematics Education Trust, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, VA 20191; (703) 620-9840, ext. 2112.

December 1. Math Scholarships.
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics offers several scholarship and grant programs for K-12 teachers interested in improving their math and teaching skills. Awards range from $1,000 to $2,000. For more information, contact: Mathematics Education Trust, 1906 Association Dr., Reston, VA 20191; (703) 620-9840, ext. 2113.

*December 5. Women's Sports.
The Women's Sports Foundation offers 100 Tampax Grants to middle and high school sports programs for girls ages 9-18. The $500 grants are designed to boost the quality of women's sports programs. For more information, contact: Tampax Grants for Girls Sports Program, Women's Sports Foundation, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow, NY 11554; (800) 227-3988.

HONORS

October 1. Insects.
The Entomological Society of America sponsors an awards program for educators who use insects as an educational tool. The society recognizes two teachers: one from grades K-6 and one from grades 7-12. The winners receive an expenses-paid trip to the ESA annual meeting and a plaque. Their schools receive a $400 grant for educational materials. To apply, teachers submit seven copies of materials and letters documenting an original activity, lesson, or exercise using insects in the classroom. For more information, contact: Entomological Society of America, Prizes for Primary and Secondary Teaching Committee, Entomological Society of America, 9301 Annapolis Rd., Lanham, MD 20706; (301) 731-4535; fax (301) 731-4538.

October 1. Private Enterprise.
Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge seeks nominations for the Leavey Awards for Excellence in Private Enterprise Education. These awards honor full-time K-12 educators and college or university professors who conceive and implement an innovative course, program, or project that fosters a better understanding of America's private enterprise system. Up to 20 educators receive $7,500 each; a special award of $15,000 may be given for an unusually meritorious entry. Eligible programs must have been launched or operated during the 1997-98 academic year. Entries may be submitted by instructor teams or individuals. For more information, contact: Lorri Oziri, Awards Department, Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, 1601 Valley Forge Rd., P.O. Box 706, Valley Forge, PA 19482-0706; (610) 933-8825, ext. 253; fax (610) 935-0522; e-mail: loziri@ffvf.org; www.ffvf.org.

October 10. Science And Technology.
Tandy Corp., with the support of the National Association of Secondary School Principals, announces the Tandy Technology Scholars Program. High schools may nominate one full-time teacher with at least three years of experience teaching at least three classes in mathematics, science, or computer science. One hundred honorees each receive $2,500. For more information, contact: Tandy Technology Scholars, Texas Christian University, Box 298990, Fort Worth, TX 76129; (817) 924-4087; e-mail: TandyScholar@tcu.edu; www.tandy.com/scholars.

October 15. Learning Disabilities.
The International Reading Association invites applications for the Albert J. Harris Award, which recognizes an outstanding contribution to the prevention and/or assessment of reading or learning disabilities. Those who have published in a professional journal or monograph between June 1, 1997, and May 31, 1998, are eligible for the $500 award. For more information, contact: Gail Keating, Division of Research, International Reading Association, 800 Barksdale Rd, P.O. Box 8139, Newark, DE 19714-8139; (302) 731-1600, ext. 226; fax (302) 731-1057; e-mail: gkeating@reading.org.

October 15. Math And Reading Teachers.
The Addison Wesley Longman Supplementary Division, a publisher of educational materials for K-12 educators, is seeking nominations for its Cuisenaire/Dale Seymore Outstanding Math Teacher Awards and Celebration Press/Good Year Books Outstanding Reading Teacher Awards. Math or reading supervisors and a school administrator complete a nomination form and submit a videotape of the nominated teacher. Awards are given to elementary-level reading teachers and math teachers at the elementary, middle, and high school levels in each state. State winners compete for national awards. All nominees receive a certificate as well as educational materials for their respective fields. National winners are featured in a videotape on excellence and creativity in education, pictured in the publishing company's catalogs, and receive additional awards. For more information, contact: Teacher Awards, 615 Franklin Tpke., Suite 1, Ridgewood, NJ 07450-1929; (800) 237-3142; www.cuisenaire.com.

October 15. Reading Research.
The International Reading Association sponsors the Dina Feitelson Research Award. The $500 prize goes to an outstanding empirical study reporting on literacy acquisition. Research that has been published in English in a refereed journal between July 1, 1997, and June 30, 1998, may be submitted by the author or others. Nominees do not need to be members of the IRA. For more information, contact: Gail Keating, Division of Research, International Reading Association, 800 Barksdale Rd., P.O. Box 8139, Newark, DE 19714-8139; (302) 731-1600, ext. 226; fax (302) 731-1057; e-mail: gkeating@reading.org.

November 1. Innovations.
The University of Louisville invites applications for the Grawemeyer Award in Education. Created to support the implementation of ideas for improving education, the award is paid in five $30,000 annual installments. Applicants submit their books, technological projects, program initiatives, or other project proposals. For more information, contact: University of Louisville, Grawemeyer Award in Education, School of Education, Louisville, KY 40292-0001; (502) 852-3235.

November 1. Schools And Teachers.
The Target Teachers Scholarship program recognizes full- and part-time teachers at schools participating in Target's Take Charge of Education program. The Target Corp. will award two $500 scholarships for each Target store and 82 $1,500 Target district awards to teachers who want to continue their education. Target, together with the National Association of Partners in Education, has also created the Outstanding Schools Award program for any K-12 school currently enrolled in the Take Charge of Education program. Schools are selected based on level of parental and community involvement and creativity of fund-raising projects. Applications for both programs are available at all Target stores. For more information, call (800) 316-6142.

November 2. Heroes.
Northern Life Insurance Co. and ReliaStar invite nominations for the Education's Unsung Heroes Awards. Full-time K-12 educators, paraprofessionals, and school staff who have initiated an effective teaching program are eligible. One hundred finalists win $2,000 to further projects in their schools. Three grand-prize winners receive $25,000, $10,000, or $5,000 for their projects. For an application, contact: Education's Unsung Heroes Awards, c/o Citizen's Scholarship Foundation of America, 1505 Riverview Rd., P.O. Box 297, St. Peter, MN 56082; (507) 931-1682 or (800) 537-4180; fax (507) 931-2103; www.unsungheroes.com.

November 16. Films In Science.
The Science Screen Report Inc., in conjunction with the National Science Teachers Association, sponsors the Science Screen Report Award. K-12 science teachers who have used commercially available films or videos to develop a science unit or theme are encouraged to apply. One winner is selected and receives $1,000, plus up to $500 to attend the 1999 NSTA convention in Boston. Contact: National Science Teachers Association Award Programs, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201-3000; (703) 243-7100; (888) 400-NSTA; www.nsta.org.

November 16. Science.
The National Science Teachers Association, in conjunction with various corporate and association sponsors, offers a number of awards for K-12 science teachers. The criteria for each award varies, but most applicants are judged on the basis of their leadership, teaching, curricula, and influence. Sponsors include the American Water Works Association, Barrick Goldstrike Mines Inc., CIBA Specialty Chemicals Corp., Duracell, Shell Oil Co., Toyota, Craftsman, and Toshiba. Awards include cash prizes of up to $10,000, computers, NSTA memberships, and expenses-paid trips to the 1999 NSTA convention in Boston. For more information, contact: National Science Teachers Association Award Programs, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201-3000; (888) 400-NSTA or (703) 243-7100; www.nsta.org.

November 16. Science Facilities.
Sheldon Laboratory Systems seeks applicants for its Sheldon Exemplary Equipment and Facilities Award. This award, offered in conjunction with the National Science Teachers Association, honors a K-12 teacher who effectively uses classroom and laboratory space, furniture, fixtures, and teaching apparatus. The winner receives $1,000, plus up to $500 to attend the 1999 NSTA convention in Boston. For more information, contact: National Science Teachers Association Award Programs, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201-3000; (703) 243-7100; (888) 400-NSTA; www.nsta.org.

November 16. Science Teaching.
The 1998 Gustav Ohaus Awards for Innovations in Science Teaching are given to teachers with innovative ideas for improving science education. Proposals might include new designs in curricula, instructional methods, or program organization and administration. Ohaus Corp., a manufacturer of educational scales, and the National Science Teachers Association sponsor the awards. One $1,000 prize and one $750 prize are given in four categories: elementary school, middle school, high school, and junior college. For more information, contact: National Science Teachers Association-Ohaus Awards Program, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201-3000; (703) 243-7100; (888) 400-NSTA; www.nsta.org.

Vol. 10, Issue 2, Pages 62-65

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