November 30, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 36, Issue 14
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Advocates worry that the incoming Trump administration could scale back federal civil rights enforcement in education after nearly eight years of high-profile attention to the subject.
Even before President-elect Donald Trump takes office, states are forging ahead on agendas they’ve been crafting since the Every Student Succeeds Act passed a year ago.
Schools are paying renewed attention to researchers' warnings that the "blue light" from mobile devices can shake the sleep patterns of children and teenagers.
Starting in fall 2017, English-learner students will be able to request extra time or other accommodations on the college-entrance exam.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
Most education schools are already meeting higher-than-required standards on GPAs and testing, says a report from the National Council on Teacher Quality.
Nationwide, data show that nearly 7 percent of high school freshmen stop out for four weeks or more—and then return to graduate.
Education Week checks back with Ayat Husseini, a student whose parents were reluctant to to let her leave home to attend her first-choice college.
Education leaders are responding to student walkouts, racist graffiti, bullying infused with political jabs, and fears of deportation and harassment for some students.
Advocates for charters, vouchers, and other forms of school choice express mixed views about what the new administration may mean.
Making child care more affordable was one of a handful of education policy positions that President-elect Donald Trump tackled on the campaign trail.
President-elect Donald Trump's 10-year-old son is in a private school in Manhattan for now, and the family has yet to say what might come next.
In the campaign, President-elect Donald Trump promised to deport millions of undocumented immigrants, build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, and repeal protections granted to certain young immigrants. Will he follow through?
The New Jersey Department of Education is considering loosening the cap on superintendents' salaries by increasing the amount they could be paid annually.
The Texas Education Agency has told schools that they must provide services to all eligible students with disabilities and that they won't be penalized for serving too many children, after the U.S. Department of Education ordered the state agency to end an 8.5 percent benchmark on special education enrollment.
The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear the appeal of a group of Kansas parents and students who object on religious grounds to the state's adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards.
U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. has called on states to stop allowing schools to use corporal punishment to discipline students, arguing that it is a "harmful practice."
The U.S. education system's erasure of Indigenous historical and present realities is damaging to Native students, writes Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz.
New partnerships and investments in young people's creative capital can rejuvenate arts education, writes EdVestors CEO Laura Perille.
Calling politicians out on their bigotry isn't a matter of bringing politics into the classroom, writes teacher Lucas Jacob.
Letters
To improve the graduation odds of Alaska Native students, some key schooling changes are required, writes Evon Peter of the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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