November 9, 2016

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Vol. 36, Issue 12
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The advent of computers, smartphone apps, e-books, and other electronic media devices has transformed the way Americans read. Is it changing the way our children to learn to read and write as well?
Is the digital revolution transforming literacy instruction in the nation’s schools? Should it? In a new report, Education Week takes a look.
For educators, digital literacy means much more than learning to read online. Here's a guide to understanding it.
Most experts agree that even the very youngest students should be learning with a mix of print and digital texts.
The Common Core State Standards allow for technology use in the classroom, but they don’t make a big push for teaching digital literacy.
Can iPads, social media apps, and digital reading platforms help teenagers better engage with a 500-year-old literary classic?
Some experts predicted that e-books and digital devices would turn print books into relics, but that hasn’t happened—at least not yet.
While it deals primarily in print books, a new app presents yet another angle on how digital technology is changing literacy instruction in schools.
School librarians increasingly find themselves teaching students how to navigate and consume information online—and helping teachers embed those skills into the curriculum.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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