November 2, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 36, Issue 11
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The goal is to spur adoption of legislation requiring the formation of advisory committees charged with finding ways to improve the safe and ethical use of technology.
Educators and advocates worry about long-lasting effects of the 2016 campaign's harsh rhetoric directed at immigrants, Muslims, and communities of color.
The common core's lesser-known literacy standards call for teaching students to write, read, and analyze like historians, scientists, or other discipline experts.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Obituary
Report Roundup
Correction
Rising test scores and shrinking achievement gaps are among the bright spots in the latest science results from the 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress.
With growing evidence that the nation's cyber charter schools are plagued by serious academic and management problems, Education Week conducted a months-long investigation into what is happening in this niche sector of K-12 schooling. The result is a deep-dive account of what's wrong with cyber charters.
Official school tours don't start at the national museum until 2017 but classes are already flocking to the museum and tapping its resources.
The first national study of principals’ time use finds that school leaders clock long hours—and many of them are spent on paperwork.
An organization led by former U.S. Secretary of Education William J. Bennett signs up four state lawmakers and a state board member in Alabama, Colorado, Nevada, Ohio, and Wisconsin.
Guidance released Friday makes it clear that well-rounded means more than just music and arts, even though those are important. It can include everything from foreign language courses to Advanced Placement to civics education to college and career counseling.
Confused about where the common core stands nationally? See which states have kept the common core and which have (at least officially) replaced or rewritten it, with this new interactive map.
Get a jump on the issues, candidate positions, and policy stakes in the Nov. 8 federal and state elections.
In a heated election year, education has proven to be a muted issue at the presidential level, but a hot topic in a variety of state showdowns.
Students would be wise to learn the strategies fact-checkers use to evaluate online information, write Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew.
The Hyde Schools founder Joseph Gauld weighs in on the election, ESSA, and social-emotional learning with Education Week Commentary.
Letters
This divisive election season is a stark reminder of the role of objective information in informing policy, writes Michael J. Feuer.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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