October 5, 2016

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Vol. 36, Issue 07
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Dallas and other urban districts opened new single-gender schools this year, aiming to boost access to specialized programs and compete with charter, private, or suburban schools.
The 2016-17 high court term could prove to be the most consequential in years for K-12, including cases on special education and aid to religion.
Political heartburn continues in the Hoosier State over high-stakes assessments, with the issue spilling over into this year's contests for governor and state schools superintendent.
New data show that 12 percent of all U.S. public school teachers are in their first or second year, raising questions both about the overall stability of the teaching force.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
But scores are yet to be released for the revised college-admission exam, introduced in March.
A website created for civic leaders and the public offers a collection of education data for 114 cities in 49 states and the District of Columbia.
Researchers are using computerized assessment data to peel back the curtain on the strategies students use to solve test questions.
A study of New York city schools finds that students are more likely to see bullying in 6-8 or 5-8 schools than in 6-12 or K-12 schools.
A multiyear endeavor organized by the Aspen Institute seeks to helps schools better teach social and emotional skills alongside traditional academic subjects.
A First Amendment expert says K-12 officials can't discipline students for acts of protest that don't disrupt school operations.
The legal action—which focuses on academic content licensing, royalties, and photocopying—has potentially big implications for the use of open educational resources in schools.
Despite a late, bipartisan push, momentum seems to have stalled in the U.S. Senate on the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act.
Advocates and researchers are pleased to see GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump focus on the topics in his campaign, while still seeking more detail.
Anne Holton, whose husband, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, is Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's running mate, is Virginia's former education secretary and a campaign ambassador.
The state’s Supreme Court strikes down the funding mechanism for Nevada’s groundbreaking education savings account program, a little more than a year after lawmakers enacted it.
As Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump squared off, a crowd of high school debate team members gathered at a watching party in Nevada were less than impressed.
Distrust among school leaders and educators can depress teacher retention and harm students, writes Dana Barlin.
Teachers, parents, and school leaders have a role in fostering student empathy, particularly when children are very young, writes Jessica Sager.
In the first weeks of the school year, fatal police shootings have once again raised deep concerns about the relationships between police officers and communities of color. Such events can be difficult to process and discuss for both students and educators.
Kaya Henderson reflects on her tenure as she prepares to step down from her post as schools chief in the nation's capital.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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