August 24, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 36, Issue 01
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More than 109,000 students were paddled, swatted, or otherwise physically punished in 2013-14, an Education Week analysis finds.
In 2011, given the choice between a paddling and a school suspension, Trey Clayton chose the physical punishment. He’s sorry he did.
Angered by cuts to K-12 budgets, low pay, and other grievances, a scrappy group of teachers is attempting to upend Oklahoma's political establishment this election season.
The Council of the Great City Schools, a formidable advocate for urban districts, faces new tests to its staying power as it turns 60.
News in Brief
Correction
Obituary
Report Roundup
An Education Week analysis of federal data reveals that high school students don’t have universal access to physics classes—despite a national push for STEM studies.
Education Week, which marks its 35th anniversary with the start of the 2016-17 school year, has continued to evolve to best serve you, our readers.
As participation booms in the SAT and ACT, there’s been little notice of an opposite trend: the quiet slipping away of the SAT Subject Tests.
Eight states will work to create standards and policies for how to teach social and relational skills in K-12 schools.
Teacher shortages have continued in a number of regions, prompting legislative and administrative action.
The District of Columbia school system wants to help close an "enrichment gap" by paying for students to travel internationally before they graduate.
Despite a rocky rollout, the Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation, or CAEP, says its new standards will bring uniformity to the field.
Pioneering researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are investigating how scans of human brain activity can provide information on student problem-solving, potentially leading to better ed-tech products.
Efforts to ban corporal punishment get pushback in communities where the practice is ingrained, but change is happening.
Twenty-nine states ban corporal punishment, but rules vary even from district to district. Some schools reported using physical discipline even when their states said no.
The debate on restroom access remains unsettled, as multiple legal cases play out and enforcement of new federal guidelines is blocked for now.
The U.S. Department of Education hasn't decided how to penalize states where large numbers of students have opted-out of annual tests.
Here’s a sampling of the more than 20,000 public comments filed with the U.S. Department of Education on its proposed rules for school accountability.
Both presidential candidates talked about early-childhood issues in high-profile speeches recently, giving advocates hope that the conversation around the quality and affordability of child care and pre-K will continue.
To fulfill their mission of innovation, charter schools shouldn’t stick to one model, write Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno, and Brandon L. Wright.
Student-centered classrooms that use problem-based learning and differentiation are not all that they’re cracked up to be, writes teacher Brian Field.
Teachers can play a role in improving mental-health outcomes for students as long as they have the tools to do so, writes Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk.
Letters
Teachers and their unions should play a greater role in determining who remains in the profession, writes former district superintendent Marc F. Bernstein.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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