August 3, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 37
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Faced with a dearth of common-core-aligned English/language arts curricula, state education officials asked teachers to create a homegrown, online program—and made it free to all.
The effort by the New Jersey Center for Teaching and Learning, which taps teachers of other subjects, produces more physics teachers a year than any preservice program in the country.
With the political conventions over, national security and other concerns may tamp down the profile of education in the policy debates leading up to November's presidential election.
Principals on ESSA: Some states are asking school leaders to weigh in on the new law.
Having a growth mindset may help buffer students from low-income families from the effects of poverty on academic achievement, researchers found in a first-of-its kind, large-scale study of 168,000 10th grade students in Chile.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
A year after state lawmakers moved to break up the nation’s fifth-largest school district, a new plan instead would reorganize and decentralize it.
Best of the Blogs
A Michigan woman is responsible for filing some 500 federal complaints against school districts and others with websites she says disregard the needs of users who are blind or visually impaired.
Teachers see potential to use the Pokémon Go game to help teach local history, civics, and other lessons, but skeptics worry about privacy risks.
The new federal K-12 law contains strong requirements for input from principals and others as states create new education plans, but some worry state commitment may be far from uniform.
More than 300 educators, researchers, and advocates respond to a proposed federal rule on how to define whether minorities are disproportionately identified for special education services.
Democrat Tim Kaine, a U.S. Sen. From Virginia, and Republican Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana bring varied perspectives on education as they vie for the vice presidency.
Proven in-school programs can reduce violence, write Roseanna Ander and Julia Quinn of the University of Chicago Crime Lab and Education Lab.
In an ever-shrinking world, global competency is essential for both educators and their students, writes Fernando M. Reimers.
Letters
This publishing year, Education Week Commentary lost one of its most prolific freelance back-page illustrators, Bob Dahm.
The return on investment in education has grown in recent decades, so why does our spending on incarceration outpace aid to education, asks John B. King Jr.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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