June 8, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 34
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Charters have evolved from the original idea of allowing parents and teachers to create new kinds of public schools into a powerful movement driven, to a large extent, by private philanthropy.
The clash involving the Obama administration's "Dear Colleague" letter on transgender students' choice of restrooms spotlights the often-arcane wrangling over federal regulatory guidance.
Concerns about literacy and other shortfalls on the part of some child-care and preschool staff members renew calls for more training and support to boost worker qualifications.
Katherine and Kenia were among the recent surge of Central American children fleeing to the U.S. Now they're graduating from high school.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
A federal effort to prod agencies to be bold, collaborative, and flexible in working with disengaged youths has spurred slow change, a report says.
Newly introduced federal legislation is looking to help teachers move from one state to another without jumping through a lot of hoops.
Analysts see signs that the market, both globally and in the United States, is cooling off a bit after years of intense activity.
Best of the Blogs

Twenty-five years ago this month, Minnesota passed the country's first charter school law. Since then, the charter sector has expanded exponentially. Explore the evolution of charter schools and debate over diversity.
Charter schools have long been criticized for a lack of diversity, but a national analysis reveals a varied demographic profile.
Timing issues, as well as electoral uncertainties, complicate the picture as states and districts weigh accountability rules under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
School districts are girding for the possible cutoff of state funding at the end of the month if lawmakers fail to satisfy a Kansas high court ruling demanding more equitable K-12 funding.
Schools across the country are preparing to formally track students from military families, monitoring their academic progress as they move from military base to military base and state to state, under a new provision in the federal education law.
School boards spend too much time on routine and not enough on issues that could have an impact on student achievement, writes Cathy Mincberg.
To evaluate students' soft skills, educators should rely on their training rather than a standardized assessment, argue educators Jessica and Skip Potts.
To address absenteeism, it's not enough to just look at numbers of school days students miss, write Russell Rumberger and Michael Gottfried.
Donovan Livingston shares his viral poem, "Lift Off," which he delivered as his convocation speech at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and has been viewed over 11 million times.
Amid the contentious debate over transgender restroom policies, Amira Hasenbush of the Williams Institute at UCLA delves into the relevant research.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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