June 1, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 32
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Public Montessori schools are springing up around the country, as new research raises questions about how the model will fit with states' and districts' test-focused accountability systems.
The number of civil rights complaints and investigations spiked dramatically during the Obama administration.
Research triggers a debate on whether students of color are underrepresented—or overrepresented—in special education classes.
Federal education officials say they're trying to give states and districts meaningful flexibility under the Every Student Succeeds Act, while staying true to the law's civil rights mandate.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
The Obama administration's guidance to schools on the rights of transgender students has provoked protests, lawsuits, and uncertainty among educators.
The new nonprofit, known as UnboundEd, is offering teachers free common-core-aligned curricular materials and paid professional development.
The first major independent research study on the edTPA, a closely watched new licensing exam for teachers, raises questions about the test’s ties to effective teaching.
Best of the Blogs
The number of teachers in the United States using games in their classrooms has doubled over the past six years, a new nationwide survey shows.
Only 43 percent of 8th graders reached proficiency on the first NAEP in technology and engineering, but girls had a slight edge over boys.
The five-year-old document is a public recognition of how race and ethnicity play out in students' educational outcomes, and a call to narrow achievement gaps.
Denver Montessori Junior/Senior High School offers teenagers opportunities to run an urban farm and learn bicycle repair, along with more traditional academic studies.
A new study done by the Government Accountability Office lands amid fresh calls to address the share of schools that are both economically and racially segregated.
The fate of challenges to state K-12 funding formulas is far from random, often hinging on the specifics and ambiguities of each state's constitution.
School resource officers and the schools they serve require a culture shift to reduce the discipline rates of girls of color, writes Rebecca Epstein.
Monique W. Morris, author and researcher, discusses the plight of black girls, who are disproportionately turned out of K-12 schools.
In four videos, education researchers discuss their perspectives on the criminalizing of black girls in American schools, including by school resource officers.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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