May 18, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 31
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Having begged for state aid and borrowed millions at untenable rates, the district is rapidly approaching fiscal insolvency.
An escalating legal fight between the Obama administration and state officials could still leave federal funds at risk for the state's K-12 schools.
A mix of social and cultural forces keep many African-American, Latino, and low-income students off the track toward international math recognition.
An expansive new law in Florida allowing students to more easily cross district lines to go to school spotlights the opportunities and challenges in open-enrollment.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
A report finds that charter, virtual, and alternative schools account for a disproportionate percentage of schools with low graduation rates.
A new report from the Urban Institute explains how systemic barriers that begin at birth put black, Latino, and Native American males at risk of underperformance.
After more than 10 years under state authority, the city's public schools—most of them charters—will be supervised by the locally elected school board.
A meta-analysis of 15 years' worth of research found 1-to-1 laptop programs had a positive impact on students' English, math, and science scores.
Best of the Blogs
With district leaders at odds with the teachers' union and state officials over the city's K-12 finances, educators, parents, and students worry about the future.
Recruitment hurdles may loom for presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in filling education slots with GOP policy veterans should he take the White House.
Educators and lawmakers in some states want to move away from one-size-fits-all school rankings and offer more information using a model drawn from the business world.
Merrick B. Garland, nominated for a U.S. Supreme Court seat, clerked for Justice William J. Brennan Jr. in the 1978-79 term, which included high-profile education cases.
Allowing students to graduate after their sophomore year and providing two years of alternative options could curb dropout rates, proposes Blair E. Lybbert.
States must invest in better school funding systems to improve student outcomes, say law professors Charles J. Ogletree Jr. and Kimberly Jenkins Robinson.
After Malia Obama's decision to delay college, more high school graduates should consider the importance of an academic break, argues David Santulli.
Letters
Despite the increase in high school graduates, barriers to a diploma are still present for many students, writes John Gomperts.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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