April 27, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 29
toc cover
Past Issues

For past issues, select from the drop-down menu.

Teachers of art history are introducing students to great works with new precision through high-resolution images, immersive technologies, YouTube videos, and other platforms and digital systems.
The recent cheating scandals that rocked schools in New York and Georgia exacted a toll on students whose scores were fudged, according to researchers.
Fed up with years of political battles over state funding, cash-strapped Davenport plans to pull $2.7 million from its reserves despite state prohibitions.
A federal appeals court ruling that Title IX protects the rights of students to use restrooms that correspond with their gender identity could have far-reaching implications for schools.
While affirming the constitutionality of California's teacher job-protection laws, the state appeals court decried "deplorable" school-staffing arrangements.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Tests aligned to the common-core standards and specially designed for students with severe cognitive disabilities are managing to fill a need for a broad swath of states.
Contrary to what Star Trek's Mr. Spock says, research suggests that emotion is not the enemy of reason: It may be a best friend to learning.
Art in Action trains parents in 19 states to teach art in schools that have cut the subject from the curriculum.
Best of the Blogs
Students in AP art history classes are now exposed to a much wider range of artworks from different cultures as part of a revision of the curriculum.
Negotiators agreed to rules on key assessment issues under the Every Student Succeeds Act, but failed to reach accord on regulations covering a sticky spending issue.
A divided high court hears oral arguments over the Obama administration’s program to give protection from deportation to unauthorized immigrants whose children are U.S. citizens.
In his first public return to the nation’s capital, the former U.S. Secretary of Education issues a call for greater transparency and a focus on results.
To maximize education outcomes for pre-K students and others, policymakers must include practitioners in crafting policy, writes Yasmina Vinci of the National Head Start Association.
For many students, cellphones have become a modern security blanket and an impediment to learning, warns former Montana teacher of the year Steve Gardiner.
Education policy should not prescribe children's access to institutions at the expense of their personal development, capabilities, or happiness, writes Kimberlee Everson.
As ESSA returns autonomy over teacher evaluation to states, Ross Wiener shares insights from state leaders on how to strengthen the process.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

Most Popular Stories