April 20, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 28
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Efforts to increase college persistence, especially for low-income, first-generation students, are catching on in some charter schools.
After years of steady decline, the number of school-age students covered under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act has swung upward since the 2011-12 school year, an Education Week analysis shows.
Tracking factors like how students feel about their safety and well-being in school has been off limits to some districts. A new tool from the U.S. Department of Education will make measuring school climate widely accessible.
GOP presidential candidate and first-term Texas Sen. Ted Cruz has slammed the Common Core State Standards and made support for charter schools and vouchers a top legislative priority.
News in Brief
Use this interactive map to see how much your district spends on students and how per-pupil spending compares across the nation.
Report Roundup
Current ways of studying students' social-emotional skills must improve if they are to be used for accountability, experts cautioned at a recent gathering of education researchers.
Helping students rethink the emotions they feel during stressful transitions can make a big difference, new research has found.
Encouraging students to draw not just on their own internal skills and experiences, but also assets from individuals and community is a key to successful "maker" education, research suggests.
Researchers at the recent American Educational Research Association summit discussed findings on socioeconomic disparities in how K-12 technology is used, and ed-tech's potential as a tool for social justice.
Indiana has become the latest state to seek to curb persistent teacher shortages by offering college-tuition dollars to students who go into teaching.
Best of the Blogs
With the 2016 state legislative season nearing its halfway point, testing and related issues fuel legislative debate, as well as tensions between lawmakers and state education officials.
The Education Department and some in Congress appear on a collision course over how the Every Student Succeeds Act handles federal spending on students from low-income backgrounds.
Students can learn subject matter that might conflict with their religion without it comprising their beliefs, write professors Adam Laats and Harvey Siegel.
With the passage of ESSA, states must build on the college-and-career readiness progress of the past decade, writes Matt Gandal.
In a Commentary Q&A, Dave Isay, founder of StoryCorps, discusses the role of mentors in guiding students toward their professional callings.
Charlotte Danielson, educator and author, offers a number of remedies she believes can strengthen the teaching practice and its flawed evaluation structure.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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